Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Fringillidae > Loxia > Loxia leucoptera
 

Loxia leucoptera (White-winged Crossbill; Two-barred Crossbill)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The two-barred crossbill (Loxia leucoptera), known as the white-winged crossbill in North America, is a small passerine bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It has two subspecies, white-winged crossbill Loxia leucoptera leucoptera in North America, and two-barred crossbill Loxia leucoptera bifasciata in NE Europe and N Asia. The scientific name is from Ancient Greek. Loxia is from loxos, "crosswise", and leucoptera means "white-winged" from leukos, "white" and pteron, "wing".
View Wikipedia Record: Loxia leucoptera

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
12
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 2.58112
EDGE Score: 1.27568

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  29 grams
Breeding Habitat [2]  Boreal forests
Wintering Geography [2]  Northern U.S./Canada
Wintering Habitat [2]  Boreal forests
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  20 %
Diet - Plants [3]  30 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  30 %
Forages - Mid-High [3]  60 %
Forages - Understory [3]  40 %
Clutch Size [4]  4
Clutches / Year [1]  3
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  70,000,000
Incubation [1]  13 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  4 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (121)

Ecosystems

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Caribbean Islands Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent And The Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks And Caicos Islands, Virgin Islands - British, Virgin Islands - U.S. No

Prey / Diet

Abies balsamea (Canadian fir)[5]
Picea glauca (Canadian spruce)[6]
Tsuga canadensis (Canada hemlock)[5]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Dendroctonus rufipennis (spruce beetle)1
Erethizon dorsatus (common porcupine)1
Tamiasciurus hudsonicus (red squirrel)1

Predators

Accipiter striatus (Sharp-shinned Hawk)[6]

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Making The Forest And Tundra Wildlife Connection
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License