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Passer domesticus (House Sparrow)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The house sparrow (Passer domesticus) is a bird of the sparrow family Passeridae, found in most parts of the world. A small bird, it has a typical length of 16 cm (6.3 in) and a mass of 24–39.5 g (0.85–1.39 oz). Females and young birds are coloured pale brown and grey, and males have brighter black, white, and brown markings. One of about 25 species in the genus Passer, the house sparrow is native to most of Europe, the Mediterranean region, and much of Asia. Its intentional or accidental introductions to many regions, including parts of Australia, Africa, and the Americas, make it the most widely distributed wild bird.
View Wikipedia Record: Passer domesticus

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

Passer domesticus (the house sparrow) is a small bird, native to Eurasia and northern Africa, that was intentionally introduced to the Americas. Passer domesticus are non-migratory birds that are often closely associated with human populations and are found in highest abundance in agricultural, suburban and urban areas. They tend to avoid woodlands, forests, grasslands and deserts. Particularly high densities of Passer domesticus were found where urban settlements meet agricultural areas. They may evict native birds from their nests and out-compete them for trophic resources. Early in its invasion of North America, Passer domesticus began attacking ripening grains on farmland and was considered a serious agricultural pest. Recent surveys indicate populations are declining.
View ISSG Record: Passer domesticus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
18
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.03365
EDGE Score: 1.61615

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  25 grams
Birth Weight [1]  2 grams
Breeding Habitat [2]  Generalist, Agricultural
Wintering Geography [2]  Non-migrartory
Wintering Habitat [2]  Generalist, Agricultural
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  10 %
Diet - Plants [3]  30 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  60 %
Forages - Understory [3]  50 %
Forages - Ground [3]  50 %
Female Maturity [1]  5 months 2 days
Male Maturity [1]  1 year
Clutch Size [4]  2
Clutches / Year [1]  4
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  520,000,000
Incubation [1]  11 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  23 years
Wing Span [5]  9 inches (.239 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

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Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

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Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Cape Peninsula National Park; North America; Serra do Cipo National Park; Serra dos Orgaos National Park; Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake;

External References

Audio

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Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5DETERMINATION OF BODY DENSITY FOR TWELVE BIRD SPECIES, DAVID M. HAMERSHOCK, THOMAS W. SEAMANS, GLEN E. BERNHARDT, WRIGHT LAB WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH (1993)
6Ecology of Commanster
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Frugivory and seed dispersal of Carissa spinarum (L.) in a tropical deciduous forest of central India, R. M. MISHRA & PUSHPLATA GUPTA, Tropical Ecology 46(2): 151–156, 2005
9"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
10AVIAN PREDATION OF THE EVERGREEN BAGWORM (LEPIDOPTERA: PSYCHIDAE), Robert G. Moore and Lawrence M. Hanks, PROC. ENTOMOL. SOC. WASH. 102(2), 2000, pp. 350-352
11Contribution to the study of the diet of four owl species (Aves, Strigiformes) from mainland and island areas of Greece, Haralambos Alivizatos, Vassilis Goutner and Stamatis Zogaris, Belg. J. Zool., 135 (2) : 109-118
12Body sizes, activity times, food habits and reproduction of brown tree snakes (Boiga irregularis) (Serpentes : Colubridae) from tropical north Queensland, Australia, D. F. Trembath and S. Fearn, Australian Journal of Zoology, 2008, 56, 173–178
13Diet Composition of the Pharaoh Eagle Owl, Bubo ascalaphus, in Azraq Nature Reserve, Jordan, Adwan H. SHEHAB, Michal CIACH, Turk J Zool 32 (2008) 65-69
14DIET OF BREEDING CINEREOUS HARRIERS (CIRCUS CINEREUS) IN SOUTHEASTERN BUENOS AIRES PROVINCE, ARGENTINA, María S. Bó, Sandra M. Cicchino, Mariano M. Martínez, J. Raptor Res. 34(3):237-241
15Diet of the Timber Rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus, Rulon W. Clark, Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 494-499, 2002
16Naoroji, R. (2011). Breeding of the Red-headed Falcon Falco chicquera in Saurashtra, Gujarat, India. Forktail, 27, 1-6.
17Olsen, J., E. Fuentes, DM Bird, AB Rose, and D. Judge. 2008. Dietary shifts based upon prey availability in Peregrine Falcons and Australian Hobbies breeding near Canberra, Australia Journal of Raptor Research 42:125–137
18THE PARASITIC FAUNA AND THE FOOD HABITS OF THE WILD JUNGLE CAT FELIS CHAUS FURAX DE WINTON, 1898 IN IRAQ, Mohammad K. Mohammad, Bull. Iraq nat. Hist. Mus. (2008) 10(2): 65-78
19DIETS OF NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS AND NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS IN WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA, DENVER W. HOLT AND LESLIE A. LEROUX, Wilson Bull., 108(1), 1996, pp. 123-128
20del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
21Body size, diet and reproductive ecology of Coluber hippocrepis in the Rif (Northern Morocco), Juan M. Pleguezuelos, Soumia Fahd, Amphibia-Reptilia 25: 287-302 (2004)
22Spermophilus tridecemlineatus, Donald P. Streubel and James P. Fitzgerald, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 103, pp. 1-5 (1978)
23Motta-Junior, JC, C. J R. Alho, and S. C S. Belentani. 2004. Food habits of the Striped Owl Asio clamator in southeast Brazil Pages 777–784 in Raptors worldwide: proceedings of the VI world conference on birds of prey and owls (R. Chancellor and B.-U. Meyburg, Eds.)
24Food habits of Zamenis longissimus (Laurenti, 1768) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Colubridae) in Bieszczady (south-eastern Poland), BARTŁOMIEJ NAJBAR, Vertebrate Zoology 57 (1) 2007, 73-77
25Correlates between morphology, diet and foraging mode in the Ladder Snake Rhinechis scalaris (Schinz, 1822), Juan M. Pleguezuelos , Juan R. Fernández-Cardenete , Santiago Honrubia , Mónica Feriche , Carmen Villafranca, Contributions to Zoology, 76 (3) – 2007
26Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
27International Flea Database
28Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
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