Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Soricomorpha > Soricidae > Sorex > Sorex cinereus
 

Sorex cinereus (masked shrew; Cinereus Shrew; common shrew)

Synonyms: Sorex cinereus nigriculus
Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

The cinereus shrew or masked shrew (Sorex cinereus) is a small shrew found in Alaska, Canada and the northern United States. This is the most widely distributed shrew in North America, where it is also known as the common shrew.
View Wikipedia Record: Sorex cinereus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
17
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.36
EDGE Score: 1.85

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  5 grams
Birth Weight [2]  .28 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  70 %
Diet - Scavenger [3]  30 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [4]  5 months 4 days
Gestation [4]  19 days
Litter Size [4]  6
Litters / Year [1]  2
Maximum Longevity [1]  3 years
Nocturnal [5]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [1]  2.756 inches (7 cm)
Weaning [4]  23 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (101)

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Dendroctonus rufipennis (spruce beetle)[6]
Myrmica alaskensis (Ant)[6]
Pristiphora erichsonii (larch sawfly)[2]
Scaphinotus angusticollis (Ground Beetle)[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Catharus ustulatus (Swainson's Thrush)2
Certhia americana (Brown Creeper)1
Picoides arcticus (Black-backed Woodpecker)1
Zonotrichia leucophrys (White-crowned Sparrow)2

Predators

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

Bruce Peninsula National Park; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Sorex cinereus, John O. Whitaker, Jr., MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 743, pp. 1–9 (2004)
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
5Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
6Exploring the Denali Food Web, ParkWise, National Park Service
7DIET OF NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS IN SOUTHERN WISCONSIN, SCOTT R. SWENGEL AND ANN B. SWENGEL, The Condor 94:707-711 (1992)
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9International Flea Database
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Calvin College Ecosystem Preserve
Edwin S. George Reserve, University of Michigan, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Hope College Biology Nature Preserve
Images provided by Wikimedia Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License