Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Chiroptera > Noctilionoidea > Noctilionidae > Noctilio > Noctilio leporinus
 

Noctilio leporinus (greater bulldog bat)

Language: Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The greater bulldog bat or fisherman bat (Noctilio leporinus) is a type of fishing bat native to Latin America (Spanish: Murciélago pescador). The bat uses echolocation to detect water ripples made by the fish upon which it preys, then uses the pouch between its legs to scoop the fish up and its sharp claws to catch and cling to it. It is not to be confused with the lesser bulldog bat, which, though belonging to the same genus, merely catches water insects, such as water striders and water beetles.
View Wikipedia Record: Noctilio leporinus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
13
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
40
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 26.6
EDGE Score: 3.32

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  69 grams
Birth Weight [1]  6 grams
Female Weight [1]  60 grams
Male Weight [1]  78 grams
Weight Dimorphism [1]  30 %
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Fish [2]  50 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  50 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year
Male Maturity [1]  1 year
Gestation [1]  35 days
Litter Size [3]  1
Litters / Year [3]  1
Maximum Longevity [3]  12 years
Nocturnal [4]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [1]  3.15 inches (8 cm)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Czosnowia paraguayensis[7]
Myodopsylla wolffsohni wolffsohni[8]
Trichohelix proencai <Unverified Name>[7]
Tricholeiperia proencai <Unverified Name>[7]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Memphis Zoological Garden & Aquarium
Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo

Range Map

Distribution

Caribbean; Middle America; Patfa Valley dry forests; South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Diet of the fishing bat Noctilio leporinus (Linnaeus) (Mammalia, Chiroptera) in a mangrove area of southern Brazil, Marcelo O. Bordignon, Rev. Bras. Zool. [online]. 2006, vol.23, n.1, pp. 256-260
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
8International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License