Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Primates > Hominoidea > Hominidae > Homo > Homo sapiens
 

Homo sapiens (man; human)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

Homo sapiens (Latin: "wise man") is the binomial nomenclature (also known as the scientific name) for the only extant human species. Homo is the human genus, which also includes Neanderthals and many other extinct species of hominid; H. sapiens is the only surviving species of the genus Homo. Modern humans are the subspecies Homo sapiens sapiens, which differentiates them from what has been argued to be their direct ancestor, Homo sapiens idaltu. The ingenuity and adaptability of Homo sapiens has led to its becoming the most influential species on the Earth; it is currently deemed of least concern on the Red List of endangered species by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.
View Wikipedia Record: Homo sapiens

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
6
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
28
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 12.44
EDGE Score: 2.6

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  136.764 lbs (62.035 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  7.304 lbs (3.313 kg)
Diet [2]  Omnivore
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  13 years
Male Maturity [1]  14 years
Gestation [1]  9 months 10 days
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  0.3
Maximum Longevity [1]  123 years
Speed [4]  27.447 MPH (12.27 m/s)
Weaning [1]  1 year 9 months

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

Africa; Australia; Caribbean; Europe & Northern Asia; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); Middle America; North America; Oceania; South America; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
7International Flea Database
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License