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Ochotona princeps (pika; American Pika)

Wikipedia Abstract

The American pika (Ochotona princeps), a diurnal species of pika, is found in the mountains of western North America, usually in boulder fields at or above the tree line. They are herbivorous, smaller relatives of rabbits and hares.
View Wikipedia Record: Ochotona princeps

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
25
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 9.93
EDGE Score: 2.39

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  100 grams
Birth Weight [1]  9 grams
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  11 months 17 days
Gestation [1]  30 days
Litter Size [1]  3
Litters / Year [1]  2
Maximum Longevity [1]  7 years
Weaning [1]  28 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Martes americana (American Marten)[4]
Mustela erminea (Ermine)[4]
Mustela frenata (Long-tailed Weasel)[5]
Ursus arctos (Grizzly Bear)[6]

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

Audio

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Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Disparate determinants of summer and winter diet selection of a general herbivore, Ochotona princeps, M. Denise Dearing, Oecologia (1996) 108:467-478
4Responses of pikas (Ochotona princeps, Lagomorpha) to naturally occurring terrestrial predators, Barbara L. Ivins and Andrew T. Smith, Behav Ecol Sociobiol (1983) 13:277-285
5Mustela frenata, Steven R. Sheffield and Howard H. Thomas, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 570, pp. 1-9 (1997)
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7International Flea Database
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2