Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Lagomorpha > Leporidae > Lepus > Lepus americanus
 

Lepus americanus (Snowshoe Hare)

Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

The snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), also called the varying hare, or snowshoe rabbit, is a species of hare found in North America. It has the name "snowshoe" because of the large size of its hind feet and the marks its tail leaves. The animal's feet prevent it from sinking into the snow when it hops and walks. Its feet also have fur on the soles to protect it from freezing temperatures. The snowshoe hare may have up to four litters in a year which average three to eight young. Males compete for females, and females may breed with several males.
View Wikipedia Record: Lepus americanus

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

Lepus americanus is a small mammal of the Lagomorpha order. It is widespread in the USA and Canada, where it is found in open areas, grasslands, swamps and woods. Usually solitary, they can sometimes live in very large groups. When populations reach very high densities, they can have a significant impact on forest regeneration.
View ISSG Record: Lepus americanus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
23
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.67
EDGE Score: 2.27

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  3.527 lbs (1.60 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  61 grams
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  10 months 8 days
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 1 month
Gestation [1]  36 days
Litter Size [1]  3
Litters / Year [1]  3
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  20 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Providers

Shelter 
Populus tremuloides (quaking aspen)[4]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Valley Zoo & John Janzen Nature Center

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Making The Forest And Tundra Wildlife Connection
5Prey Abundance, Space Use, Demography, and Foraging Habitat of Northern Goshawks in Western Washington, Thomas David Bloxton, Jr., University of Washington 2002
6Exploring the Denali Food Web, ParkWise, National Park Service
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Martes americana, Tim W. Clark, Elaine Anderson, Carman Douglas, and Marjorie Strickland, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 289, pp. 1-8 (1987)
9Mustela frenata, Steven R. Sheffield and Howard H. Thomas, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 570, pp. 1-9 (1997)
10International Flea Database
11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License