Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Sciuridae > Sciurus > Sciurus carolinensis
 

Sciurus carolinensis (eastern gray squirrel; gray squirrel; grey squirrel)

Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

Sciurus carolinensis, common name eastern gray squirrel or grey squirrel depending on region, is a tree squirrel in the genus Sciurus. It is native to eastern North America, but has since been introduced to European regions.
View Wikipedia Record: Sciurus carolinensis

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

The grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is native to deciduous forests in the USA and has been introduced to the UK, Ireland, Italy and South Africa. In the introduced range grey squirrels damage trees by eating the bark and in Europe they cause the local extinction of red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) populations through competition and disease.
View ISSG Record: Sciurus carolinensis

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
0
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
9
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 2.96
EDGE Score: 1.38

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Gestation [2]  44 days
Litter Size [2]  4
Litters / Year [2]  2
Maximum Longevity [2]  24 years
Speed [4]  11.99 MPH (5.36 m/s)
Weaning [2]  66 days
Adult Weight [2]  1.175 lbs (533 g)
Birth Weight [2]  15 grams
Diet [3]  Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  20 %
Diet - Plants [3]  30 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  50 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  11 months 13 days
Male Maturity [2]  1 year 1 month

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (122)

Ecosystems

Emblem of

North Carolina

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (67)Full list (153)

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Aalborg Zoo
Milwaukee County Zoological Gardens
Osaka Municipal Tennoji Zool. Gdns.
Saint Louis Zoological Park

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
5Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Diet of the Timber Rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus, Rulon W. Clark, Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 494-499, 2002
8International Flea Database
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Edwin S. George Reserve, University of Michigan, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License