Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Sciuridae > Tamias > Tamias townsendii
 

Tamias townsendii (Townsend's chipmunk)

Wikipedia Abstract

Townsend's chipmunk (Neotamias townsendii) is a species of rodent in the squirrel family Sciuridae. It lives in the forests of the Pacific Northwest of North America, from British Columbia through western Washington and Oregon. A large chipmunk, adults can be 36 cm (14 in) from nose to tail. In much of its range, it is the only chipmunk; it can be identified by its tail which is grayish above and reddish below, and by its brown coloration with indistinct tawny stripes. Townsend's chipmunk hibernates in regions where the winter is harsh, but in other parts of its range that have a more mild climate it can be active year-round. It is omnivorous, eating a variety of plants and insects and even birds' eggs. Townsend's chipmunks in the Oregon Coast Range have higher population densities in area
View Wikipedia Record: Tamias townsendii

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
18
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.87
EDGE Score: 1.93

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  75 grams
Birth Weight [1]  4 grams
Diet [2]  Frugivore, Granivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  50 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  50 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  11 months 23 days
Gestation [1]  28 days
Litter Size [1]  5
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  9 years
Weaning [1]  50 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Accipiter cooperii (Cooper's Hawk)[4]
Accipiter gentilis (Northern Goshawk)[4]

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Tamias townsendii, Dallas A. Sutton, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 435, pp. 1-6 (1993)
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License