Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Muroidea > Cricetidae > Peromyscus > Peromyscus maniculatus
 

Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse)

Synonyms:
Language: French; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

Peromyscus maniculatus is a rodent native to North America. It is most commonly called the deer mouse, although that name is common to most species of Peromyscus, and thus is often called the North American deermouse and is fairly widespread across the continent, with the major exception being the southeast United States and the far north. Like other Peromyscus species, it is a vector and carrier of emerging infectious diseases such as hantaviruses and Lyme disease. It is closely related to Peromyscus leucopus, the white-footed mouse.
View Wikipedia Record: Peromyscus maniculatus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
12
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.56
EDGE Score: 1.52

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Gestation [2]  24 days
Litter Size [2]  5
Litters / Year [2]  3
Maximum Longevity [2]  8 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Speed [4]  8.321 MPH (3.72 m/s)
Weaning [2]  22 days
Adult Weight [2]  21 grams
Birth Weight [2]  2 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  50 %
Diet - Scavenger [3]  10 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  20 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  49 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (183)

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No

Prey / Diet

Artemisia frigida (Fringed sagewort)[5]
Bouteloua aristidoides (needle grama)[5]
Certhia americana (Brown Creeper)[5]
Sorghum halepense (aleppo milletgrass)[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

North America; Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4MAXIMAL RUNNING SPEEDS OF BIPEDAL AND QUADRUPEDAL RODENTS, MINOU DJAWDAN and THEODORE GARLAND, JR., J. Mamm., 69(4):765-772, 1988
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Food Habits of Peromyscus and Reithrodontomys in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, Oklahoma, Anthony J. Stancampiano and William Caire, Proc. Okla. Acad. Sci. 75: 45-49 (1995)
7DIET OF NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS IN SOUTHERN WISCONSIN, SCOTT R. SWENGEL AND ANN B. SWENGEL, The Condor 94:707-711 (1992)
8Comparative Diets of Burrowing Owls in Oregon and Washington, Gregory A. Green, Richard E. Fitzner, Robert G. Anthony and Lee E. Rogers, Northwest Science, Vol. 67, No. 2, 1993, pp. 88-93
9DIET OF THE GREAT HORNED OWL IN THE CRESTON VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1998 - 2005, Linda M. Van Damme, Wildlife Afield 2:2 December 2005, pp. 73-78
10Diet of the Timber Rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus, Rulon W. Clark, Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 494-499, 2002
11Feeding ecology of the Great Basin Rattlesnake (Crotalus lutosus, Viperidae), Xavier Glaudas, Tereza Jezkova, and Javier A. Rodríguez-Robles, Can. J. Zool. 86: 723–734 (2008)
12DIETS OF NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS AND NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS IN WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA, DENVER W. HOLT AND LESLIE A. LEROUX, Wilson Bull., 108(1), 1996, pp. 123-128
13Resources of a Snake Community in Prairie-Woodland Habitat of Northeastern Kansas, Henry S. Fitch, U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Wildlife Research Report 13: 83-98 (1982)
14Feeding Ecology of the California Mountain Kingsnake, Lampropeltis zonata (Colubridae), Harry W. Greene and Javier A. Rodríguez-Robles, Copeia, 2003(2), pp. 308–314
15Davis, H., and RJ Cannings. 2008. Diet of Western Screech-Owls in the interior of British Columbia British Columbia Birds 18:19-22
16Feeding ecology of North American gopher snakes (Pituophis catenifer, Colubridae), JAVIER A. RODRÍGUEZ-ROBLES, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2002, 77, 165–183
17Spilogale gracilis, B. J. Verts, Leslie N. Carraway, and Al Kinlaw, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 674, pp. 1–10 (2001)
18Resource utilization by two insular endemic mammalian carnivores, the island fox and island spotted skunk, Kevin R. Crooks and Dirk Van Vuren, Oecologia (1995) 104:301-307
19DIET COMPOSITION AND REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS OF MEXICAN SPOTTED OWLS, Mark E. Seamans and R.J. Gutiérrez, J. Raptor Res. 33(2):143-148
20ECOLOGY OF THE MEXICAN ALPINE BLOTCHED GARTER SNAKE (THAMNOPHIS SCALARIS), Javier Manjarrez, Crystian S. Venegas-Barrera, and Tamara García-Guadarrama, THE SOUTHWESTERN NATURALIST 52(2):258–262 (2007)
21Thomomys townsendii, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 719, pp. 1–6 (2003)
22International Flea Database
23Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License