Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Muroidea > Cricetidae > Peromyscus > Peromyscus truei
 

Peromyscus truei (pinyon mouse; piñon mouse)

Synonyms:
Language: Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The pinyon mouse (Peromyscus truei) is native to the southwestern United States and Baja California in Mexico. These medium-sized mice are often distinguished by their relatively large ears. The range of this species extends from southern Oregon and Wyoming in the north, and extends south to roughly the U.S.-Mexico border, with a disjunct population designated as Peromyscus true comanche that occupies an area in the vicinity of Palo Duro Canyon in the Texas panhandle.
View Wikipedia Record: Peromyscus truei

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
12
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.56
EDGE Score: 1.52

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  25 grams
Birth Weight [1]  2 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  50 %
Diet - Scavenger [2]  10 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  20 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  50 days
Gestation [1]  26 days
Litter Size [1]  3
Litters / Year [1]  5
Maximum Longevity [1]  5 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Speed [4]  8.948 MPH (4 m/s)
Weaning [1]  30 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Strix occidentalis occidentalis (California spotted owl)[6]

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4MAXIMAL RUNNING SPEEDS OF BIPEDAL AND QUADRUPEDAL RODENTS, MINOU DJAWDAN and THEODORE GARLAND, JR., J. Mamm., 69(4):765-772, 1988
5Food Habits of Rodents Inhabiting Arid and Semi-arid Ecosystems of Central New Mexico, ANDREW G. HOPE AND ROBERT R. PARMENTER, Special Publication of the Museum of Southwestern Biology, NUMBER 9, pp. 1–75 (2007)
6General Biology of Major Prey Species of the California Spotted Owl, Daniel F. Williams, Jared Verner, Howard F. Sakai, and Jeffrey R. Waters, USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-133. 1992. Chapter 10, pp. 207-221
7International Flea Database
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License