Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Muroidea > Cricetidae > Microtus > Microtus pennsylvanicus
 

Microtus pennsylvanicus (meadow vole)

Synonyms:
Language: French; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus), sometimes called the field mouse or meadow mouse, is a North American vole found across Canada, Alaska and the northern United States. Its range extends farther south along the Atlantic coast. One subspecies, the Florida salt marsh vole (M. p. dukecampbelli), is found in Florida, and is classified as endangered. Previously it was also found in Chihuahua, Mexico, but has not been recorded since 1998.
View Wikipedia Record: Microtus pennsylvanicus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
17
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.27
EDGE Score: 1.84

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  49 grams
Birth Weight [1]  2 grams
Diet [2]  Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  80 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  20 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  29 days
Male Maturity [1]  37 days
Gestation [1]  21 days
Litter Size [1]  6
Litters / Year [1]  3
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  14 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (106)

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (59)Full list (115)

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

Bruce Peninsula National Park; Cedar Creek LTER Site; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6DIET OF NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS IN SOUTHERN WISCONSIN, SCOTT R. SWENGEL AND ANN B. SWENGEL, The Condor 94:707-711 (1992)
7BREEDING SEASON DIET OF SHORT-EARED OWLS IN MASSACHUSETTS, DENVER W. HOLT, Wilson Bull., 105(3), 1993, pp. 490-496
8Blarina brevicauda, Sarah B. George, Jerry R. Choate, and Hugh H. Genoways, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 261, pp. 1-9 (1986)
9DIET OF THE GREAT HORNED OWL IN THE CRESTON VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1998 - 2005, Linda M. Van Damme, Wildlife Afield 2:2 December 2005, pp. 73-78
10Diet of the Timber Rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus, Rulon W. Clark, Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 494-499, 2002
11Diet of the Prairie Rattlesnake, Crotalus viridis viridis, in Southeastern Alberta, Margaret M. A. Hill, G. Lawrence Powell, and Anthony P. Russell, Canadian Field-Naturalist 115(2): 241-246 (2001)
12DIETS OF NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS AND NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS IN WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA, DENVER W. HOLT AND LESLIE A. LEROUX, Wilson Bull., 108(1), 1996, pp. 123-128
13Davis, H., and RJ Cannings. 2008. Diet of Western Screech-Owls in the interior of British Columbia British Columbia Birds 18:19-22
14International Flea Database
15Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License