Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Muroidea > Muridae > Rattus > Rattus rattus
 

Rattus rattus (black rat)

Synonyms:
Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

The black rat (Rattus rattus, also known as the ship rat, roof rat, house rat, Alexandrine rat, old English rat, and other names) is a common long-tailed rodent of the genus Rattus (rats) in the subfamily Murinae (murine rodents). The species originated in tropical Asia and spread through the Near East in Roman times before reaching Europe by the 1st century and spreading with Europeans across the world. Black rats are generalist omnivores. They are serious pests to farmers as they eat a wide range of agricultural crops.
View Wikipedia Record: Rattus rattus

Invasive Species

A native of the Indian sub-continent, the ship rat (Rattus rattus) has now spread throughout the world. It is widespread in forest and woodlands as well as being able to live in and around buildings. It will feed on and damage almost any edible thing. The ship rat is most frequently identified with catastrophic declines of birds on islands. It is very agile and often frequents tree tops searching for food and nesting there in bunches of leaves and twigs.
View ISSG Record: Rattus rattus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
11
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.34
EDGE Score: 1.47

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Gestation [2]  22 days
Litter Size [2]  7
Litters / Year [2]  4
Maximum Longevity [2]  4 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Weaning [2]  26 days
Adult Weight [2]  200 grams
Birth Weight [2]  5 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  30 %
Diet - Plants [3]  10 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  40 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  90 days
Male Maturity [2]  3 months 22 days

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Al Hajar montane woodlands Oman Afrotropic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Arabian Peninsula coastal fog desert Oman, Yemen, Saudi Arabia Afrotropic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Gulf of Oman desert and semi-desert Oman, United Arab Emirates Afrotropic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Southwestern Arabian foothills savanna Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Oman Afrotropic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Southwestern Arabian montane woodlands Yemen, Saudi Arabia Afrotropic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (199)

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

North America; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
6Glis glis (Rodentia: Gliridae), BORIS KRYSTUFEK, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(865):195–206 (2010)
7Anurans as prey: an exploratory analysis and size relationships between predators and their prey, L. F. Toledo, R. S. Ribeiro & C. F. B. Haddad, Journal of Zoology 271 (2007) 170–177
8Goodman, S. M., Creighton, G. K. & Raxworthy, C. (1991). The food habits of the Madagascar long-eared owl Asio madagascariensis in southeastern Madagascar Bonn. Zool. Beitr. 42: 21-26.
9Predation upon small mammals in shrublands and grasslands of southern South America: ecological correlates and presumable consequences, Fabian M. Jaksic, Revista Chilena de Historia Natural 59: 209-221 (1986)
10Population growth and density, diet and breeding success of striated caracaras Phalcoboenus australis on New Island, Falkland Islands, Paulo Catry, Miguel Lecoq, Ian J. Strange, Polar Biology Volume 31, Number 10, 1167-1174
11NESTING BIOLOGY AND DIET OF THE MADAGASCAR HARRIER (CIRCUS MACROSCELES) IN AMBOHITANTELY SPECIAL RESERVE, MADAGASCAR, Lily-Arison Rene de Roland, Jeanneney Rabearivony, and Ignace Randriamanga, J. Raptor Res. 38(3):256-262
12Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
13Eira barbara, Steven J. Presley, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 636, pp. 1–6 (2000)
14Food habits of Brazilian boid snakes: overview and new data, with special reference to Corallus hortulanus, Lígia Pizzatto, Otavio A.V. Marques, Kátia Facure, Amphibia-Reptilia 30 (2009): 533-544
15THE PARASITIC FAUNA AND THE FOOD HABITS OF THE WILD JUNGLE CAT FELIS CHAUS FURAX DE WINTON, 1898 IN IRAQ, Mohammad K. Mohammad, Bull. Iraq nat. Hist. Mus. (2008) 10(2): 65-78
16Galictis cuja, Eric Yensen and Teresa Tarifa, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 728, pp. 1–8 (2003)
17Body size, diet and reproductive ecology of Coluber hippocrepis in the Rif (Northern Morocco), Juan M. Pleguezuelos, Soumia Fahd, Amphibia-Reptilia 25: 287-302 (2004)
18POPULATION STATUS AND DIET OF THE YELLOW-LEGGED GULL IN THE AZORES, VERÓNICA C. NEVES, NADIA MURDOCH & ROBERT W. FURNESS, ARQUIPÉLAGO. Ciências Biológicas e Marinhas Nº 23A (2006): 59-73
19DIET AND ACTIVITY PATTERNS OF LEOPARDUS GUIGNA IN RELATION TO PREY AVAILABILITY IN FOREST FRAGMENTS OF THE CHILEAN TEMPERATE RAINFOREST, Stephania Eugenia Galuppo Gaete, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, Masters thesis, September 2014
20Feeding Habits of the Diamond Python, Morelia s. spilota: Ambush Predation by a Boid Snake, David J. Slip and Richard Shine, Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 22, No. 3, pp. 323-330, 1988
21The diet of moreporks (Ninox novaeseelandiae) in relation to prey availability, and their roost site characteristics and breeding success on Ponui Island, Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand., Kirsty Marie Denny, A thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Ecology at Massey University, Albany New Zealand. (2009)
22Food Habits of the Snake Psammophis phillipsi from the Continuous Rain-Forest Region of Southern Nigeria (West Africa), GODFREY C. AKANI, EDEM A. ENIANG, ITOHOWO J. EKPO, FRANCESCO M. ANGELICI, AND LUCA LUISELLI, Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 37, No. 1, pp. 208–211, 2003
23PREY REMAINS OF THE JAMAICAN OWL (PSEUDOSCOPS GRAMMICUS), GARY R. GRAVES, J. Carib. Ornithol. 20:53-55, 2007
24Contribution to the study of the diet of four owl species (Aves, Strigiformes) from mainland and island areas of Greece, Haralambos Alivizatos, Vassilis Goutner and Stamatis Zogaris, Belg. J. Zool., 135 (2) : 109-118
25The Diet of the Madagascar Red Owl (Tyto soumagnei) on the Masoala Peninsula, Madagascar, Steven M. Goodman and Russell Thorstrom, Wilson Bull., 110(3), 1998, pp. 417-421
26Correlates between morphology, diet and foraging mode in the Ladder Snake Rhinechis scalaris (Schinz, 1822), Juan M. Pleguezuelos , Juan R. Fernández-Cardenete , Santiago Honrubia , Mónica Feriche , Carmen Villafranca, Contributions to Zoology, 76 (3) – 2007
27International Flea Database
28Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License