Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Muroidea > Muridae > Rattus > Rattus norvegicus
 

Rattus norvegicus (Norway rat)

Synonyms:
Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

The brown rat, also referred to as common rat, street rat, sewer rat, Hanover rat, Norway rat, brown Norway rat, Norwegian rat, or wharf rat (Rattus norvegicus) is one of the best known and most common rats. Selective breeding of Rattus norvegicus has produced the laboratory rat, a model organism in biological research, as well as pet rats.
View Wikipedia Record: Rattus norvegicus

Invasive Species

The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) is globally widespread and costs primary industry hundreds of millions of dollars per year. It has caused or contributed to the extinction or range reduction of native mammals, birds, reptiles and invertebrates through predation and competition. It restricts the regeneration of many plant species by eating seeds and seedlings, eats food crops and spoils human food stores by urinating and defecating in them. Additional economic damage is caused by chewing through power cables and spreading diseases.
View ISSG Record: Rattus norvegicus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
14
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.23
EDGE Score: 1.66

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  300 grams
Birth Weight [1]  6 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  30 %
Diet - Plants [2]  10 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  40 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  90 days
Male Maturity [1]  70 days
Gestation [1]  21 days
Litter Size [1]  10
Litters / Year [1]  4
Maximum Longevity [1]  5 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Speed [4]  2.461 MPH (1.1 m/s)
Weaning [1]  25 days

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Arabian Peninsula coastal fog desert Oman, Yemen, Saudi Arabia Afrotropic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (202)

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (58)Full list (264)

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Australia; North America; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4RUNNING SPRINGS: SPEED AND ANIMAL SIZE, CLAIRE T. FARLEY, JAMES GLASHEEN AND THOMAS A. MCMAHON, J. exp. Biol. 185, 71–86 (1993)
5Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Contribution to the study of the diet of four owl species (Aves, Strigiformes) from mainland and island areas of Greece, Haralambos Alivizatos, Vassilis Goutner and Stamatis Zogaris, Belg. J. Zool., 135 (2) : 109-118
8Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
9THE PARASITIC FAUNA AND THE FOOD HABITS OF THE WILD JUNGLE CAT FELIS CHAUS FURAX DE WINTON, 1898 IN IRAQ, Mohammad K. Mohammad, Bull. Iraq nat. Hist. Mus. (2008) 10(2): 65-78
10Body size, diet and reproductive ecology of Coluber hippocrepis in the Rif (Northern Morocco), Juan M. Pleguezuelos, Soumia Fahd, Amphibia-Reptilia 25: 287-302 (2004)
11POPULATION STATUS AND DIET OF THE YELLOW-LEGGED GULL IN THE AZORES, VERÓNICA C. NEVES, NADIA MURDOCH & ROBERT W. FURNESS, ARQUIPÉLAGO. Ciências Biológicas e Marinhas Nº 23A (2006): 59-73
12Liang, H., Li, N., & Chen, Z. (2016). The prey tactics by two owl species in the forest of northeastern China. Folia Zoologica, 65(3), 208-213.
13International Flea Database
14Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Images provided by Wikimedia Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License