Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Cetacea > Balaenidae > Eubalaena > Eubalaena glacialis
 

Eubalaena glacialis (Northern Right Whale; North Atlantic Right Whale; black right whale)

Synonyms: Balaena biscayensis; Balaena glacialis; Balaena glacialis glacialis; Balaena nordcaper
Language: French; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis, which means "good, or true, whale of the ice") is a baleen whale, one of three right whale species belonging to the genus Eubalaena, all of which were formerly classified as a single species. Because of their docile nature, their slow surface-skimming feeding behaviors, their tendencies to stay close to the coast, and their high blubber content (which makes them float when they are killed, and which produced high yields of whale oil), right whales were once a preferred target for whalers.At present, they are among the most endangered whales in the world, and they are protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and Marine Mammal Protection Act and Canada's Species at Risk Act. There are about 400 individuals in existence in the wester
View Wikipedia Record: Eubalaena glacialis

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Eubalaena glacialis

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
6
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
62
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 14
EDGE Score: 4.79

Attributes

Gestation [2]  11 months 20 days
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [2]  0.29
Maximum Longevity [2]  67 years
Migration [1]  Interoceanic
Water Biome [1]  Coastal
Weaning [2]  7 months 3 days
Adult Weight [2]  25.353 tons (23,000.00 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  1,751.203 lbs (794.328 kg)
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates)
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  100 %
Forages - Marine [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  8 years
Male Maturity [2]  8 years

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Calanus finmarchicus[4]
Neocalanus plumchrus[4]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Homo sapiens (man)[5]
Notorynchus cepedianus (Tiger shark)[5]
Orcinus orca (Killer Whale)[5]

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

Eastern Atlantic Ocean; Western Atlantic Ocean;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Food Web Relationships of Northern Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca : a Synthesis of the Available Knowledge, Charles A. Simenstad, Bruce S. Miller, Carl F. Nyblade, Kathleen Thornburgh, and Lewis J. Bledsoe, EPA-600 7-29-259 September 1979
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License