Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Mustelidae > Enhydra > Enhydra lutris
 

Enhydra lutris (Sea Otter)

Synonyms: Mustela lutris
Language: Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a marine mammal native to the coasts of the northern and eastern North Pacific Ocean. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (31 and 99 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals. Unlike most marine mammals, the sea otter's primary form of insulation is an exceptionally thick coat of fur, the densest in the animal kingdom. Although it can walk on land, the sea otter lives mostly in the ocean.
View Wikipedia Record: Enhydra lutris

Infraspecies

Enhydra lutris kenyoni (northern sea otter)
Enhydra lutris lutris (sea otter)
Enhydra lutris nereis (southern sea otter)

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Enhydra lutris

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
52
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 6.58
EDGE Score: 4.1

Attributes

Gestation [3]  4 months 20 days
Litter Size [3]  1
Litters / Year [3]  1
Maximum Longevity [3]  27 years
Speed [5]  5.592 MPH (2.5 m/s)
Water Biome [1]  Coastal
Weaning [3]  5 months 25 days
Adult Weight [2]  62.777 lbs (28.475 kg)
Birth Weight [3]  4.118 lbs (1.868 kg)
Female Weight [2]  52.029 lbs (23.60 kg)
Male Weight [2]  73.525 lbs (33.35 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [2]  41.3 %
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Fish [4]  50 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  50 %
Forages - Marine [4]  100 %
Female Maturity [3]  2 years 8 months
Male Maturity [3]  3 years 9 months

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); North America;

External References

Photos

Webcams


Monterey Bay Aquarium Otter Cam
Cam Time:
Hours: - ( - )
Feeding: Dly , ,

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Enhydra lutris, James A. Estes, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 133, pp. 8 (1980)
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7CephBase - Cephalopod (Octopus, Squid, Cuttlefish and Nautilus) Database
8Alaska Wildlife Notebook Series, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
9COEXISTENCE IN A KELP FOREST: SIZE, POPULATION DYNAMICS, AND RESOURCE PARTITIONING IN A GUILD OF SPIDER CRABS (BRACHYURA, MAJIDAE), ANSON H. HINES, Ecological Monographs, 52(2), 1982, pp. 179-198
10Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Specially protected natural territories of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Images provided by Wikimedia Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License