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Mustela erminea (Ermine; stoat)

Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

The stoat (Mustela erminea), also known as the short-tailed weasel, is a mammal of the genus Mustela of the family Mustelidae native to Eurasia and North America, distinguished from the least weasel by its larger size and longer tail with a prominent black tip. The name ermine is often, but not always, used for the animal in its pure white winter coat, or the fur thereof. In the late 19th century, stoats were introduced into New Zealand to control rabbits, where the stoats have had a devastating effect on native bird populations.
View Wikipedia Record: Mustela erminea

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

Mustela erminea (the stoat) is an intelligent, versatile predator specialising in small mammals and birds. It is fearless in attacking animals larger than itself and adapted to surviving periodic shortages by storage of surplus kills. In New Zealand it is responsible for a significant amount of damage to populations of native species.
View ISSG Record: Mustela erminea

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
25
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 9.87
EDGE Score: 2.39

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  110 grams
Birth Weight [1]  2 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Ectothermic [2]  10 %
Diet - Endothermic [2]  70 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  10 %
Diet - Vertibrates [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  3 months 5 days
Male Maturity [1]  1 year
Gestation [1]  43 days
Litter Size [1]  7
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  13 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  45 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (333)

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Alpenzoo Innsbruck - Tirol
Municipal Independent Org. Roev Ruchei
NY State Zoo at Thompson Park
Ranua Wildlife Park
Tiergarten Heidelberg

Range Map

Distribution

Australia; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); North America; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Ecology of Commanster
6OLIVIER GILG1, BENOÎT SITTLER, AND ILKKA HANSKI, WILL COLLARED LEMMINGS AND THEIR PREDATORS BE THE FIRST VERTEBRATES TO “FALL OVER THE CLIFF” IN GREENLAND DUE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGES? Gyrfalcons and Ptarmigan in a Changing World – Conference Proceedings 2011, p. 131-132
7Lepus arcticus, Troy L. Best and Travis Hill Henry, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 457, pp. 1-9 (1994)
8Microtus californicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae), NICHOLE L. CUDWORTH AND JOHN L. KOPROWSKI, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(868):230–243 (2010)
9Microtus miurus (Rodentia: Cricetidae), F. RUSSELL COLE AND DON E. WILSON, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(855):75–89 (2010)
10Microtus montanus, Wendy E. Sera and Cathleen N. Early, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 716, pp. 1–10 (2003)
11Microtus richardsoni, Daniel R. Ludwig, Mammalian Species No. 223, pp. 1-6 (1984)
12Clethrionomys californicus, Lois F. Alexander and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 406, pp. 1-6 (1992)
13Making The Forest And Tundra Wildlife Connection
14Alaska Wildlife Notebook Series, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
15Responses of pikas (Ochotona princeps, Lagomorpha) to naturally occurring terrestrial predators, Barbara L. Ivins and Andrew T. Smith, Behav Ecol Sociobiol (1983) 13:277-285
16Spermophilus franklinii, Andrea C. Ostroff and Elmer J. Finck, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 724, pp. 1–5 (2003)
17Martes zibellina (Carnivora: Mustelidae), VLADIMIR G. MONAKHOV, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(876):75–86 (2011)
18Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
19International Flea Database
20Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License