Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Felidae > Lynx > Lynx rufus
 

Lynx rufus (Bobcat)

Synonyms: Felis rufus
Language: French; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The bobcat (Lynx rufus) is a North American cat that appeared during the Irvingtonian stage of around 1.8 million years ago (AEO). Containing 12 recognized subspecies, it ranges from southern Canada to central Mexico, including most of the continental United States. The bobcat is an adaptable predator that inhabits wooded areas, as well as semidesert, urban edge, forest edges, and swampland environments. It remains in some of its original range, but populations are vulnerable to local extinction ("extirpation") by coyotes and domestic animals. With a gray to brown coat, whiskered face, and black-tufted ears, the bobcat resembles the other species of the mid-sized Lynx genus. It is smaller on average than the Canada lynx, with which it shares parts of its range, but is about twice as large
View Wikipedia Record: Lynx rufus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
25
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 9.87
EDGE Score: 2.39

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  18.96 lbs (8.60 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  265 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Endothermic [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year
Male Maturity [1]  2 years
Gestation [1]  65 days
Litter Size [1]  3
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  32 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  65 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (159)

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Cathartes aura (Turkey Vulture)[4]
Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle)[4]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Aplodontia rufa, Leslie N. Carraway and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 431, pp. 1-10 (1993)
6Neotoma cinerea, Felisa A. Smith, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 564, pp. 1-8 (1997)
7Spermophilus saturatus, Stephan C. Trombulak, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 322, pp. 1-4 (1988)
8Conepatus leuconotus (Carnivora: Mephitidae), JERRY W. DRAGOO AND STEVEN R. SHEFFIELD, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 827:1–8 (2009)
9Cynomys ludovicianus, John L. Hoogland, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 535, pp. 1-10 (1996)
10Dipodomys spectabilis, Troy L. Best, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 311, pp. 1-10 (1988)
11Lepus alleni, Troy L. Best and Travis Hill Henry, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 424, pp. 1-8 (1993)
12Lepus californicus, Troy L. Best, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 530, pp. 1-10 (1996)
13Lepus townsendii, Burton K. Lim, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 288, pp. 1-6 (1987)
14Microtus chrotorrhinus, Gordon L. Kirkland, Jr. and Frederick J. Jannett, Jr., Mammalian Species No. 180, pp. 1-5 (1982)
15Microtus oregoni, Leslie N. Carraway and B. J. Verts, Mammalian Species No. 233, pp. 1-6 (1985)
16Microtus townsendii, John E. Cornely and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 325, pp. 1-9 (1988)
17Mustela frenata, Steven R. Sheffield and Howard H. Thomas, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 570, pp. 1-9 (1997)
18Clethrionomys californicus, Lois F. Alexander and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 406, pp. 1-6 (1992)
19Napaeozapus insignis, John O. Whitaker, Jr., and Robert E. Wrigley, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 14, pp. 1-6 (1972)
20Neotoma fuscipes, L. N. Carraway and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 386, pp. 1-10 (1991)
21Neotoma micropus, J. K. Braun and M. A. Mares, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 330, pp. 1-9 (1989)
22Odocoileus hemionus, Allen E. Anderson and Olof C. Wallmo, Mammalian Species No. 219, pp. 1-9 (1984)
23Spermophilus variegatus, Emily C. Oaks, Paul J. Young, Gordon L. Kirkland, Jr., and David F. Schmidt, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 272, pp. 1-8 (1987)
24Sciurus arizonensis, Troy L. Best and Suzanne Riedel, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 496, pp. 1-5 (1995)
25Sciurus griseus, Leslie N. Carraway and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 474, pp. 1-7 (1994)
26Sciurus niger, John L. Koprowski, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 479, pp. 1-9 (1994)
27Sorex vagrans, Scott W. Gillihan and Kerry R. Foresman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 744, pp. 1–5 (2004)
28Spilogale putorius, Al Kinlaw, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 511, pp. 1-7 (1995)
29Sylvilagus audubonii, Joseph A. Chapman and Gale R. Willner, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 106, pp. 1-4 (1978)
30Sylvilagus bachmani, Joseph A. Chapman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 34, pp. 1-4 (1974)
31Sylvilagus cunicularius, Fernando A. Cervantes, Consuelo Lorenzo, Julieta Vargas, and Thorvald Holmes, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 412, pp. 1-4 (1992)
32Sylvilagus nuttallii, Joseph A. Chapman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 56, pp. 1-3 (1975)
33Tamias amoenus, Dallas A. Sutton, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 390, pp. 1-8 (1992)
34Tamias merriami, Troy L. Best and Nancy J. Granai, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 476, pp. 1-9 (1994)
35Zapus princeps, E. Blake Hart, Mark C. Belk, Eralee Jordan, and Malinda W. Gonzalez, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 749, pp. 1–7 (2004)
36Zapus trinotatus, William L. Gannon, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 315, pp. 1-5 (1988)
37Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
38Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
39International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License