Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Felidae > Panthera > Panthera onca
 

Panthera onca (Jaguar)

Synonyms: Felis onca; Felis onca boliviensis; Felis onca coxi; Felis onca ucayalae
Language: Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The jaguar (Panthera onca) is a big cat, a feline in the Panthera genus, and is the only extant Panthera species native to the Americas. The jaguar is the third-largest feline after the tiger and the lion, and the largest in the Americas. The jaguar's present range extends from Southwestern United States and Mexico across much of Central America and south to Paraguay and northern Argentina. Apart from a known and possibly breeding population in Arizona (southeast of Tucson) and the bootheel of New Mexico, the cat has largely been extirpated from the United States since the early 20th century.
View Wikipedia Record: Panthera onca

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
33
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.83
EDGE Score: 2.87

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  178.906 lbs (81.15 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  1.808 lbs (820 g)
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Ectothermic [2]  10 %
Diet - Endothermic [2]  80 %
Diet - Fish [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  2 years
Male Maturity [1]  2 years
Gestation [1]  3 months 9 days
Litter Size [1]  2
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  28 years
Speed [3]  28.991 MPH (12.96 m/s)
Weaning [1]  4 months 6 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Emblem of

Brazil
Guyana
Mexico

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; North America; Patfa Valley dry forests; South America;

External References

Audio

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Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Animals of the Rainforest
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(850):19–32 Bradypus variegatus (Pilosa: Bradypodidae) VIRGINIA HAYSSEN
7Choloepus hoffmanni (Pilosa: Megalonychidae), VIRGINIA HAYSSEN, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(873):37–55 (2011)
8Agouti paca, Elizabeth M. Pérez, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 404, pp. 1-7 (1992)
9Lontra longicaudis, Serge Larivière, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 609, pp. 1-5 (1999)
10Myocastor coypus, Charles A. Woods, Luis Contreras, Gale Willner-Chapman, and Howard P. Whidden, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 398, pp. 1-8 (1992)
11Nasua nasua, Matthew E. Gompper and Denise M. Decker, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 580, pp. 1-9 (1998)
12Tayassu pecari, John J. Mayer and Ralph M. Wetzel, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 293, pp. 1-7 (1987)
13International Flea Database
14Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
15THE PARASITIC FAUNA AND THE FOOD HABITS OF THE WILD JUNGLE CAT FELIS CHAUS FURAX DE WINTON, 1898 IN IRAQ, Mohammad K. Mohammad, Bull. Iraq nat. Hist. Mus. (2008) 10(2): 65-78
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2