Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Canidae > Vulpes > Vulpes velox
 

Vulpes velox (Swift Fox)

Synonyms: Canis velox; Vulpes velox hebes; Vulpes velox velox
Language: Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The swift fox (Vulpes velox) is a small light orange-tan fox around the size of a domestic cat found in the western grasslands of North America, such as Montana, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. It also lives in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta in Canada, where it was previously extirpated. It is closely related to the kit fox and the two species are sometimes known as subspecies of Vulpes velox because hybrids of the two species occur naturally where their ranges overlap.
View Wikipedia Record: Vulpes velox

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
12
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.57
EDGE Score: 1.52

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  5.291 lbs (2.40 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  40 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Ectothermic [2]  20 %
Diet - Endothermic [2]  70 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year
Male Maturity [1]  1 year
Gestation [1]  55 days
Litter Size [1]  5
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  16 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  46 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Aquila chrysaetos (Golden Eagle)[7]
Buteo regalis (Ferruginous Hawk)[7]
Canis latrans (Coyote)[7]
Canis lupus (Wolf)[7]
Taxidea taxus (American Badger)[7]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Blarina hylophaga (Soricomorpha: Soricidae), CODY W. THOMPSON, JERRY R. CHOATE, HUGH H. GENOWAYS, AND ELMER J. FINCK, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(878):94–103 (2011)
6SPECIES ASSESSMENT FOR MOUNTAIN PLOVER (CHARADRIUS MONTANUS) IN WYOMING, HAMILTON SMITH AND DOUGLAS A. KEINATH, United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, November 2004
7SPECIES ASSESSMENT FOR SWIFT FOX (VULPES VELOX) IN WYOMING, DARBY N. DARK-SMILEY AND DOUGLAS A. KEINATH, prepared for United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management, December 2003
8Neotoma lepida, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 699, pp. 1–12 (2002)
9Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
10International Flea Database
11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License