Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Cervidae > Cervus > Cervus nippon
 

Cervus nippon (Sika deer)

Wikipedia Abstract

The sika deer (Cervus nippon) also known as the spotted deer or the Japanese deer, is a species of deer native to much of East Asia, and introduced to various other parts of the world. Previously found from northern Vietnam in the south to the Russian Far East in the north, it is now uncommon in these areas, excluding Japan, where the species is overabundant.
View Wikipedia Record: Cervus nippon

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
16
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.04
EDGE Score: 1.8

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  92.595 lbs (42.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  12.677 lbs (5.75 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 4 months
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 4 months
Gestation [1]  7 months
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  26 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [4]  4.264 feet (130 cm)
Weaning [1]  5 months 22 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam No
Japan Japan No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Canis lupus (Wolf)[5]
Homo sapiens (man)[7]
Panthera tigris (Tiger)[7]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Australia; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); North America; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
5Cervus nippon, George A. Feldhamer, Mammalian Species No. 128, pp. 1-7 (1980)
6Shinsuke Koike, Hideto Morimoto, Shinsuke Kasai, Yusuke Goto, Chinatsu Kozakai, Isao Arimoto, and Koji Yamazaki (2012). Relationships Between the Fruiting Phenology of Prunus jamasakura and Timing of Visits by Mammals - Estimation of the Feeding Period Using Camera Traps, Phenology and Climate Change, Xiaoyang Zhang (Ed.)
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License