Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Cervidae > Odocoileus > Odocoileus hemionus
 

Odocoileus hemionus (mule deer)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is a deer indigenous to western North America; it is named for its ears, which are large like those of the mule. There are believed to be several subspecies, including the black-tailed deer. Unlike the related white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), mule deer are generally more associated with the land west of the Missouri River, and more specifically with the Rocky Mountain region of North America. Mule deer have also been introduced to Argentina.
View Wikipedia Record: Odocoileus hemionus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
16
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.99
EDGE Score: 1.79

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  125.664 lbs (57.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  6.504 lbs (2.95 kg)
Diet [2]  Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  90 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 3 months
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 4 months
Gestation [1]  6 months 27 days
Litter Size [1]  2
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  22 years
Speed [3]  32.01 MPH (14.31 m/s)
Weaning [1]  4 months 12 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (132)

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No

Prey / Diet

Opuntia engelmannii (cactus apple)[4]
Poa secunda (Sandberg bluegrass)[5]
Prunus virginiana (chokecherry)[5]
Shepherdia canadensis (russet buffalo-berry)[5]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; North America; Oceania; South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Dormancy and endozoochorous dispersal of Opuntia rastrera seeds in the southern Chihuahuan Desert, Maria del Carmen Mandujano, Jordan Golubov & Carlos Montaña, Journal of Arid Environments (1997) 36: 259–266
5National Geographic Magazine - May 2016 - Yellowstone - The Carnivore Comeback
6Odocoileus hemionus, Allen E. Anderson and Olof C. Wallmo, Mammalian Species No. 219, pp. 1-9 (1984)
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
10International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Images provided by Wikimedia Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License