Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Cervidae > Odocoileus > Odocoileus virginianus
 

Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer)

Synonyms: Dama virginiana; Dama virginianus
Language: French; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer native to the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, and South America as far south as Peru and Bolivia. It has also been introduced to New Zealand, Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Lesser Antilles, and some countries in Europe, such as Finland, the Czech Republic, and Serbia. In the Americas, it is the most widely distributed wild ungulate.
View Wikipedia Record: Odocoileus virginianus

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

Odocoileus virginianus is a cervid, originating in the Americas, from Canada to Brazil. It has been introduced to many other countries, such as Finland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and New Zealand. It can adapt to many types of vegetation from the forests of North America to the prairies and swamps of Florida. Its diet depends on the type of vegetation and resources available. By consuming plants, Odocoileus virginianus can have a major impact on forest regeneration, especially where population densities are high.
View ISSG Record: Odocoileus virginianus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
16
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.99
EDGE Score: 1.79

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  191.803 lbs (87.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  6.614 lbs (3.00 kg)
Diet [2]  Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  90 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  10 months 9 days
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 1 month
Gestation [1]  6 months 18 days
Litter Size [1]  2
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  22 years
Speed [3]  29.997 MPH (13.41 m/s)
Weaning [1]  4 months 9 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (212)

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No
Tumbes-Choco-Magdalena Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru No

Emblem of

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (84)Full list (188)

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Caribbean; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); Middle America; North America; Patfa Valley dry forests; South America; Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
64.2 Red wolf, Canis rufus, B.T. Kelly, A. Beyer and M.K. Phillips, Sillero-Zubiri, C., Hoffmann, M. and Macdonald, D.W. (eds). 2004. Canids: Foxes, Wolves, Jackals and Dogs. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN/SSC Canid Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x + 430 pp.
7Food niche of Puma concolor in central Mexico, Octavio Monroy-Vilchis, Yuriana Gómez, Mariusz Janczur & Vicente Urios, Wildlife Biology 15: 97-105 (2009)
8Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
10International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License