Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Bovidae > Capra > Capra hircus
 

Capra hircus (domestic goat; goat (feral))

Wikipedia Abstract

The domestic goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of goat domesticated from the wild goat of southwest Asia and Eastern Europe. The goat is a member of the family Bovidae and is closely related to the sheep as both are in the goat-antelope subfamily Caprinae. There are over 300 distinct breeds of goat. Goats are one of the oldest domesticated species, and have been used for their milk, meat, hair, and skins over much of the world. In 2011, there were more than 924 million live goats around the globe, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.
View Wikipedia Record: Capra hircus

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

The goat (Capra hircus) was domesticated 10,000 years ago in the highlands of western Iran. These herbivores have a highly varied diet and are able to ultilise a larger number of plant species than other livestock. Goats alter plant communities and forest structure and threaten vulnerable plant species. The reduction of vegetation reduces shelter options for native animals and overgrazing in native communitties leads to ecosystem degradation. Feral goats spread disease to native animals. Native fauna on islands are particularly susceptible.
View ISSG Record: Capra hircus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Not determined do to incomplete vulnerability data.
ED Score: 4.45

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  134.483 lbs (61.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  4.96 lbs (2.25 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 1 month
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 10 months
Gestation [1]  5 months 5 days
Litter Size [1]  2
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  21 years
Weaning [1]  5 months 10 days

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Gulf of Oman desert and semi-desert Oman, United Arab Emirates Afrotropic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Vachellia nilotica (Gum Arabic Tree)[3]
Vachellia tortilis (umbrella thorn)[3]

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Australia; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); North America; Oceania; South America; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4Conservation status and limiting factors in the endangered population of Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus) in the Canary Islands, José A. Donázar, César J. Palacios, Laura Gangoso, Olga Ceballos, María J. González and Fernando Hiraldo, Biological Conservation 107 (2002) 89–97
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
6Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
7International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License