Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Felidae > Panthera > Panthera pardus
 

Panthera pardus (Leopard)

Wikipedia Abstract

The leopard (Panthera pardus) (English pronunciation: /ˈlɛpərd/) is one of the five "big cats" in the genus Panthera. It is a member of the family Felidae with a wide range in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. Fossil records found in Italy suggest that in the Pleistocene it ranged as far as Europe and Japan.
View Wikipedia Record: Panthera pardus

Infraspecies

Panthera pardus delacouri (Indochinese leopard)
Panthera pardus fusca (Indian leopard)
Panthera pardus japonensis (Chinese leopard)
Panthera pardus kotiya (Sri Lankan leopard)
Panthera pardus melas (Javan leopard)
Panthera pardus nimr (Arabian leopard)
Panthera pardus orientalis (Amur leopard) (Attributes)
Panthera pardus pardus (African leopard)
Panthera pardus saxicolor

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
32
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.76
EDGE Score: 2.86

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  118.499 lbs (53.75 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  1.213 lbs (550 g)
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Endothermic [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  2 years 6 months
Male Maturity [1]  2 years 1 month
Gestation [1]  3 months 7 days
Litter Size [1]  2
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  27 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Speed [4]  38.028 MPH (17 m/s)
Weaning [1]  3 months 20 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (147)

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Emblem of

Somalia

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Canis lupus (Wolf)[8]
Crocodylus niloticus (Nile crocodile)[11]
Panthera leo (Lion)[5]
Panthera tigris (Tiger)[8]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Africa; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
5Who's Eating Who
6Addax nasomaculatus, Paul R. Krausman and Anne L. Casey, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 807, pp. 1-4 (2007)
7Antidorcas marsupialis, James W. Cain III, Paul R. Krausman, and Heather L. Germaine, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 753, pp. 1–7 (2004)
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9Kori Bustard Species Survival Plan (Ardeotis kori) Husbandry Manual, Sara Hallager, Jeanette Boylan, September 2004
10Boselaphus tragocamelus, DAVID M. LESLIE, JR., MAMMALIAN SPECIES 813:1–16 (2008)
11The Serengeti food web: empirical quantification and analysis of topological changes under increasing human impact, Sara N. de Visser, Bernd P. Freymann and Han Olff, Journal of Animal Ecology 2011, 80, 484–494
126.1 Side-striped jackal, Canis adustus, R.P.D. Atkinson and A.J. Loveridge, Sillero-Zubiri, C., Hoffmann, M. and Macdonald, D.W. (eds). 2004. Canids: Foxes, Wolves, Jackals and Dogs. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN/SSC Canid Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x + 430 pp.
13Canis mesomelas, Lyle R. Walton and Damien O. Joly, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 715, pp. 1–9 (2003)
14Equus grevyi, C. S. Churcher, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 453, pp. 1-9 (1993)
15Equus zebra, B. L. Penzhorn, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 314, pp. 1-7 (1988)
16Gazella gazella, Heinrich Mendelssohn, Yoram Yom-Tov, and Colin P. Groves, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 490, pp. 1-7 (1995)
17Heterohyrax brucei, Ronald E. Barry and Jeheskel Shoshani, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 645, pp. 1–7 (2000)
18Hystrix africaeaustralis, Erika L. Barthelmess, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 788, pp. 1-7 (2006)
19Predator–prey size relationships in an African large-mammal food web, Norman Owen-Smith and M. G. L. Mills, Journal of Animal Ecology Volume 77, Issue 1, Pages 173-183
20Madoqua guentheri, Steven C. Kingswood and Arlene T. Kumamoto, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 539, pp. 1-10 (1996)
21Madoqua kirkii, Steven C. Kingswood and Arlene T. Kumamoto, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 569, pp. 1-10 (1997)
22Predation by Forest Eagle-Owl Bubo nipalensis on Mouse Deer Moschiola meminna, Nandini R, Indian Birds Vol. 1 No. 5 (September-October 2005), p. 119-120
23Okapia johnstoni, Richard E. Bodmer and George B. Rabb, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 422, pp. 1-8 (1992)
24Orycteropus afer, Jeheskel Shoshani, Corey A. Goldman, and J. G. M. Thewissen, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 300, pp. 1-8 (1988)
256.6 Bat-eared fox, Otocyon megalotis, J.A.J. Nel and B. Maas, Sillero-Zubiri, C., Hoffmann, M. and Macdonald, D.W. (eds). 2004. Canids: Foxes, Wolves, Jackals and Dogs. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN/SSC Canid Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x + 430 pp.
26Rusa unicolor (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), DAVID M. LESLIE, JR., MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(871):1–30 (2011)
27Tetracerus quadricornis (Artiodactyla: Bovidae), DAVID M. LESLIE, JR. AND KOUSTUBH SHARMA, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 843:1–11 (2009)
28Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
29International Flea Database
30Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Specially protected natural territories of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Images provided by Wikimedia Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License