Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Felidae > Panthera > Panthera tigris
 

Panthera tigris (Tiger)

Wikipedia Abstract

The tiger (Panthera tigris) is the largest cat species, most recognisable for their pattern of dark vertical stripes on reddish-orange fur with a lighter underside. The largest wild tiger ever reported had a total body length of 3.38 m (11.1 ft) over curves and weighed 388.7 kg (857 lb). The species is classified in the genus Panthera with the lion, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard. Tigers are apex predators, primarily preying on ungulates such as deer and bovids. They are territorial and generally solitary but social animals, often requiring large contiguous areas of habitat that support their prey requirements. This, coupled with the fact that they are indigenous to some of the more densely populated places on Earth, has caused significant conflicts with humans.
View Wikipedia Record: Panthera tigris

Infraspecies

Panthera tigris altaica (Siberian tiger)
Panthera tigris amoyensis (South China tiger)
Panthera tigris balica (Balinese tiger)
Panthera tigris corbetti (Indo-Chinese tiger)
Panthera tigris sondaica (Javan tiger)
Panthera tigris sumatrae (Sumatran tiger) (Attributes)
Panthera tigris tigris (Bengal tiger)
Panthera tigris virgata (Caspian tiger)

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Panthera tigris

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
54
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.99
EDGE Score: 4.28

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  263.895 lbs (119.70 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  2.624 lbs (1.19 kg)
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Endothermic [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Emoji [3]  tiger
Gestation [1]  3 months 15 days
Litter Size [1]  3
Litters / Year [1]  0.4
Maximum Longevity [1]  26 years
Nocturnal [4]  Yes
Speed [5]  32.01 MPH (14.31 m/s)
Weaning [1]  4 months 1 day
Female Maturity [1]  3 years 5 months
Male Maturity [1]  3 years 10 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Himalaya Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan No
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam No
Sundaland Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand No
Western Ghats and Sri Lanka India, Sri Lanka No

Emblem of

Korea, Republic Of (South)
Myanmar (Burma)
Viet Nam

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Emoji by Twitter is licensed under CC BY 4.0
4Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
5Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Martes zibellina (Carnivora: Mustelidae), VLADIMIR G. MONAKHOV, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(876):75–86 (2011)
8Predation by Forest Eagle-Owl Bubo nipalensis on Mouse Deer Moschiola meminna, Nandini R, Indian Birds Vol. 1 No. 5 (September-October 2005), p. 119-120
9International Flea Database
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
11Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License