Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Felidae > Uncia > Uncia uncia
 

Uncia uncia (Snow leopard)

Synonyms: Panthera uncia

Wikipedia Abstract

The snow leopard or ounce (Panthera uncia syn. Uncia uncia) is a large cat native to the mountain ranges of Central and South Asia. It is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species because, as of 2003, the size of the global population was estimated at 4,080–6,590 adults, of which fewer than 2,500 individuals may reproduce in the wild. Estimates for the size of the global wild snow leopard population vary from at least 4,080 individuals as of 2008 to about 8,700 individuals as of 2016. The snow leopard is the National Heritage Animal of Afghanistan and Pakistan.
View Wikipedia Record: Uncia uncia

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
55
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.09
EDGE Score: 4.29

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  110.232 lbs (50.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  1.047 lbs (475 g)
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Endothermic [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  2 years
Male Maturity [1]  2 years
Gestation [1]  3 months 6 days
Litter Size [1]  2
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  21 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  77 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Himalaya Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan No
Mountains of Central Asia Afghanistan, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan No
Mountains of Southwest China China, Myanmar No

Emblem of

Afghanistan

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Callopsylla dolabris[9]
Taenia hydatigena <Unverified Name>[10]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Azas Zapovednik; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4RUKHSANA KHATOON, (2010) DIET SELECTION OF SNOW LEOPARD (Uncia uncia) IN CHITRAL AREA Master of Philosophy Thesis, Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
5Uncia uncia, Helmet Hemmer, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 20, pp. 1-5 (1972)
6Capra sibirica, Alexander K. Fedosenko and David A. Blank, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 675, pp. 1–13 (2001)
7Ovis ammon, Alexander K. Fedosenko and David A. Blank, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 773, pp. 1–15 (2005)
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9International Flea Database
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Specially protected natural territories of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License