Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Canidae > Canis > Canis mesomelas
 

Canis mesomelas (Black-backed Jackal)

Wikipedia Abstract

The black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas) is a canid native to two areas of Africa, separated by roughly 900 km. One region includes the southernmost tip of the continent, including South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, and Zimbabwe. The other area is along the eastern coastline, including Kenya, Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea and Ethiopia. It is listed by the IUCN as least concern, due to its widespread range and adaptability, although it is still persecuted as a livestock predator and rabies vector.
View Wikipedia Record: Canis mesomelas

Infraspecies

Canis mesomelas mesomelas (Black-backed jackal)
Canis mesomelas schmidti (Black-backed jackal)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
12
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.59
EDGE Score: 1.52

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  17.086 lbs (7.75 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  159 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Herbivore
Diet - Endothermic [3]  30 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  10 %
Diet - Plants [3]  30 %
Diet - Scavenger [3]  30 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  10 months 9 days
Male Maturity [2]  8 months 11 days
Gestation [2]  60 days
Litter Size [2]  4
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  17 years
Nocturnal [4]  Yes
Weaning [2]  60 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Cape Floristic Region South Africa No
Eastern Afromontane Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zimbabwe No
Horn of Africa Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Oman, Somalia, Yemen No
Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland No
Succulent Karoo Namibia, South Africa No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Hyaena brunnea (Brown Hyena)[6]
Panthera pardus (Leopard)[5]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Africa;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
16.3 Black-backed jackal Canis mesomelas, A.J. Loveridge and J.A.J. Nel, Sillero-Zubiri, C., Hoffmann, M. and Macdonald, D.W. (eds). 2004. Canids: Foxes, Wolves, Jackals and Dogs. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN/SSC Canid Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x + 430 pp.
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
5Canis mesomelas, Lyle R. Walton and Damien O. Joly, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 715, pp. 1–9 (2003)
6The Namib: Detritus and Fog Dependence Scott Christy March 1st, 2006
7Kori Bustard Species Survival Plan (Ardeotis kori) Husbandry Manual, Sara Hallager, Jeanette Boylan, September 2004
8The Serengeti food web: empirical quantification and analysis of topological changes under increasing human impact, Sara N. de Visser, Bernd P. Freymann and Han Olff, Journal of Animal Ecology 2011, 80, 484–494
9Bathyergus suillus (Rodentia: Bathyergidae), NIGEL C. BENNETT, CHRIS G. FAULKES, LEANNE HART, AND JENNIFER U. M. JARVIS, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 828:1–7 (2009)
10Cryptomys damarensis, Nigel C. Bennett and Jennifer U. M. Jarvis, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 756, pp. 1–5 (2004)
11Georychus capensis, Nigel C. Bennett, Sarita Maree, and Chris G. Faulkes, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 799, pp. 1-4 (2006)
12Gerbillurus paeba, Michael R. Perrin, Edith R. Dempster, and Colleen T. Downs, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 606, pp. 1-6 (1999)
13Madoqua guentheri, Steven C. Kingswood and Arlene T. Kumamoto, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 539, pp. 1-10 (1996)
14Madoqua kirkii, Steven C. Kingswood and Arlene T. Kumamoto, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 569, pp. 1-10 (1997)
15Otomys angoniensis, G. N. Bronner and J. A. J. Meester, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 306, pp. 1-6 (1988)
16Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
17Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
18International Flea Database
19Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License