Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Canidae > Cerdocyon > Cerdocyon thous
 

Cerdocyon thous (Crab-eating Fox)

Synonyms: Canis thous

Wikipedia Abstract

The crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), also known as the forest fox, wood fox, and the common fox, is an extant species of medium-sized canid endemic to the central part of South America, and which appeared during the Pliocene epoch. Cerdocyon comes from the Greek words kerdo (meaning fox) and cyon (dog) referring to the dog- and fox-like characteristics of this animal.
View Wikipedia Record: Cerdocyon thous

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
12
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.57
EDGE Score: 1.52

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  14.33 lbs (6.50 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  140 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  50 %
Diet - Scavenger [2]  10 %
Diet - Vertibrates [2]  40 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  9 months 4 days
Male Maturity [1]  9 months 4 days
Gestation [1]  55 days
Litter Size [1]  4
Litters / Year [1]  2
Maximum Longevity [1]  13 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  90 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Atlantic Forest Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay No
Cerrado Brazil No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No
Tumbes-Choco-Magdalena Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Diet of two sympatric carnivores, Cerdocyon thous and Procyon cancrivorus, in a restinga area of Espirito Santo State, Brazil, Andressa Gatti, Rita Bianchi, Claudia Regina Xavier Rosa and Sérgio Lucena Mendes, Journal of Tropical Ecology (2006) 22:227–230
5Anurans as prey: an exploratory analysis and size relationships between predators and their prey, L. F. Toledo, R. S. Ribeiro & C. F. B. Haddad, Journal of Zoology 271 (2007) 170–177
6FRUITING PHENOLOGY AND FRUGIVORY ON THE PALM EUTERPE EDULIS IN A LOWLAND ATLANTIC FOREST IN BRAZIL, Mauro Galetti, Valesca B. Zipparro & Patricia C. Morellato, ECOTROPICA 5: 115-122, 1999
7Gracilinanus microtarsus (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae), MATHIAS M. PIRES, EDUARDO G. MARTINS, MARIA NAZARETH F. SILVA, AND SERGIO F. DOS REIS, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(851):33–40 (2010)
8Seed dispersal of Solanum thomasiifolium Sendtner (Solanaceae) in the Linhares Forest, Espírito Santo state, Brazil, João Vasconcellos-Neto, Lidiamar Barbosa de Albuquerque and Wesley Rodrigues Silva, Acta bot. bras. 23(4): 1171-1179. 2009
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
10International Flea Database
11Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License