Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Canidae > Chrysocyon > Chrysocyon brachyurus
 

Chrysocyon brachyurus (Maned Wolf)

Synonyms: Canis brachyurus

Wikipedia Abstract

The maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is the largest canid of South America. Its markings resemble those of foxes, but it is not a fox, nor is it a wolf, as it is not closely related to other canids. It is the only species in the genus Chrysocyon (meaning "golden dog"). It is known locally as aguará guazú (meaning "large fox" in the Guarani language), or "kalak" by the Toba, lobo de crin, lobo de los esteros, or lobo colorado, and as lobo-guará in Brazil. It also is called borochi in Bolivia.
View Wikipedia Record: Chrysocyon brachyurus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
22
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.57
EDGE Score: 2.21

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  47.40 lbs (21.50 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  368 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Ectothermic [2]  20 %
Diet - Endothermic [2]  50 %
Diet - Fruit [2]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  10 %
Diet - Plants [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  2 years
Gestation [1]  64 days
Litter Size [1]  3
Maximum Longevity [1]  17 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  7 months 17 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Atlantic Forest Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay No
Cerrado Brazil No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Chrysocyon brachyurus (Maned Wolf)[4]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5The Frugivorous Diet of the Maned Wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, in Brazil: Ecology and Conservation, José Carlos Motta-Junior and Karina Martins, Seed Dispersal and Frugivory: Ecology, Evolution and Conservation, pp. 291-303 (2002)
6Feeding ecology of Ara ararauna (Aves, Psittacidae) at firebreaks in western Cerrado, Brazil, Dárius Pukenis Tubelis, Biotemas, 22 (2): 105-115, junho de 2009
7Small mammal selection and functional response in the diet of the maned wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus (mammalia: Canidae), in southeast Brazil, Adriana A. Bueno and José Carlos Motta-Junior, Mastozoologia Neotropical 13.1 (Jan 2006): p11(9)
8Anurans as prey: an exploratory analysis and size relationships between predators and their prey, L. F. Toledo, R. S. Ribeiro & C. F. B. Haddad, Journal of Zoology 271 (2007) 170–177
9Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License