Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Canidae > Cuon > Cuon alpinus
 

Cuon alpinus (Dhole; red dog; Indian dhole; Asiatic wild dog)

Synonyms: Canis alpinus

Wikipedia Abstract

The dhole (Cuon alpinus) is a canid native to Central, South and Southeast Asia. Other English names for the species include Asiatic wild dog, Indian wild dog, whistling dog, red wolf (not to be confused with Canis rufus), red dog, and mountain wolf. It is genetically close to species within the genus Canis, though its skull is convex rather than concave in profile, it lacks a third lower molar, and the upper molars sport only a single cusp as opposed to 2–4. During the Pleistocene, the dhole ranged throughout Asia, Europe and North America, but became restricted to its historical range 12,000–18,000 years ago.
View Wikipedia Record: Cuon alpinus

Infraspecies

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Cuon alpinus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
44
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.57
EDGE Score: 3.6

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  31.967 lbs (14.50 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  275 grams
Female Weight [1]  25.353 lbs (11.50 kg)
Male Weight [1]  38.581 lbs (17.50 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  52.2 %
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Endothermic [3]  90 %
Diet - Scavenger [3]  10 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  1 year
Male Maturity [2]  1 year
Gestation [2]  61 days
Litter Size [2]  5
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  16 years
Weaning [2]  58 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Cuon alpinus, James A. Cohen, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 100, pp. 1-3 (1978)
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Predation by Forest Eagle-Owl Bubo nipalensis on Mouse Deer Moschiola meminna, Nandini R, Indian Birds Vol. 1 No. 5 (September-October 2005), p. 119-120
6Tetracerus quadricornis (Artiodactyla: Bovidae), DAVID M. LESLIE, JR. AND KOUSTUBH SHARMA, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 843:1–11 (2009)
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
8International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Specially protected natural territories of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License