Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Fagales > Juglandaceae > Carya > Carya ovata
 

Carya ovata (carya ovata australis; shag-bark hickory; shagbark hickory)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

Carya ovata, the shagbark hickory, is a common hickory in the Eastern United States and southeast Canada. It is a large, deciduous tree, growing well over 100 ft (30 m) tall, and will live more than 350 years. The tallest measured shagbark, located in Savage Gulf, Tennessee, is over 150 ft (46 m) tall. Mature shagbarks are easy to recognize because, as their name implies, they have shaggy bark. This characteristic is, however, only found on mature trees; young specimens have smooth bark. The shagbark hickory's nut is edible and has a very sweet taste. The two varieties are:
View Wikipedia Record: Carya ovata

Attributes

Air Quality Improvement [1]  Low
Allergen Potential [1]  High
Carbon Capture [1]  Medium-High
Screening - Summer [2]  Moderate
Screening - Winter [2]  Porous
Shade Percentage [1]  77 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Bloom Period [2]  Late Spring
Drought Tolerance [2]  Medium
Edible [3]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Fire Tolerance [2]  Medium
Flower Type [3]  Monoecious
Frost Free Days [2]  4 months 20 days
Fruit/Seed Abundance [2]  Medium
Fruit/Seed Begin [2]  Summer
Fruit/Seed End [2]  Fall
Growth Form [2]  Single Stem
Growth Period [2]  Spring, Summer
Growth Rate [2]  Slow
Janka Hardness [4]  1880 lbf (853 kgf) Hard
Leaf Type [3]  Deciduous
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Pollinators [3]  Wind
Propagation [2]  Bare Root, Container, Seed
Root Depth [2]  4.002 feet (122 cm)
Scent [3]  The leaves are aromatic.
Seed Spread Rate [2]  Slow
Seed Vigor [2]  High
Seeds Per [2]  96 / lb (212 / kg)
Shape/Orientation [2]  Erect
Specific Gravity [5]  0.72
Structure [3]  Tree
Usage [3]  A yellow dye is obtained from the inner bark; Wood - close-grained, tough, elastic, heavy and very hard. It weighs 52lb per cubic foot; An excellent quality wood, it is used for tool handles, wheel spokes, sporting goods, baskets etc; The wood is an excellent fuel, burning well and giving off a lot of heat; It produces an excellent charcoal;
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  None
Flower Color [2]  Yellow
Foliage Color [2]  Green
Fruit Color [2]  Brown
Fall Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Flower Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Fruit Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Height [3]  98 feet (30 m)
Width [3]  49 feet (15 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 5 Low Temperature: -20 F° (-28.9 C°) → -10 F° (-23.3 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 8 Low Temperature: 10 F° (-12.2 C°) → 20 F° (-6.7 C°)
Light Preference [2]  Mixed Sun/Shade
Soil Acidity [2]  Moderate Acid
Soil Fertility [2]  Intermediate
Water Use [1]  Moderate
View Plants For A Future Record : Carya ovata

Protected Areas

Predators

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
3Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Wood Janka Hardness Scale/Chart J W Morlan's Unique Wood Gifts
5Forest Inventory and Analysis DB version 5.1, May 4, 2013, U.S. Forest Service
6HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
7Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
8Corythucha ciliata (Say) (Insecta: Hemiptera: Tingidae), Susan E. Halbert, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry; and James R. Meeker, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Forestry, February 2001. Latest revision: September 2007
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License