Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Vitales > Vitaceae > Vitis > Vitis vinifera
 

Vitis vinifera (wine grape)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

Vitis vinifera (common grape vine) is a species of Vitis, native to the Mediterranean region, central Europe, and southwestern Asia, from Morocco and Portugal north to southern Germany and east to northern Iran. There are currently between 5,000 and 10,000 varieties of Vitis vinifera grapes though only a few are of commercial significance for wine and table grape production.
View Wikipedia Record: Vitis vinifera

Attributes

Edible [1]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [1]  Hermaphrodite
Leaf Type [1]  Deciduous
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Pollinators [1]  Insects, Lepidoptera
Scent [1]  The flowers are intensely fragrant;
Structure [1]  Vine
Usage [1]  A yellow dye is obtained from the fresh or dried leaves; An oil from the seed is used for lighting and as an ingredient in soaps, paints etc; Cream of tartar, extracted from the residue of pressed grapes, is used in making fluxes for soldering; Especially when growing in hotter countries than Britain, the stems of very old vines attain a good size and have been used to supply a very durable timber;
Height [1]  49 feet (15 m)
Light Preference [3]  Full Sun
Soil Acidity [3]  Neutral
Soil Moisture [3]  Mostly Dry
View Plants For A Future Record : Vitis vinifera

Protected Areas

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

Caribbean; North America;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
3Ellenberg, H., Weber, H.E., Dull, R., Wirth, V., Werner, W., Paulissen, D. (1991) Zeigerwerte von Pflanzen in Mitteleuropa. Scripta Geobotanica 18, 1–248
4Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
5HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
6Norrbom, A.L. 2004. Fruit fly (Tephritidae) host plant database. Version Nov, 2004.
7Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
8Artibeus jamaicensis, Jorge Ortega and Iván Castro-Arellano, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 662, pp. 1–9 (2001)
9New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
10DIET OF THE ENDEMIC MADEIRA LAUREL PIGEON AND FRUIT RESOURCE AVAILABILITY: A STUDY USING MICROHISTOLOGICAL ANALYSES, PAULO OLIVEIRA, PATRICIA MARRERO AND MANUEL NOGALES, The Condor 104:811–822 (2002)
11Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
12Frugivorous diet of autumn migrant Pied Flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca: a review and new data, A. Hernández, Butll. GCA 16: 53-60, 1999
13Temporal and Spatial Variation in the Diet of the Endemic Lizard Gallotia galloti in an Insular Mediterranean Scrubland, Airam Rodríguez, Manuel Nogales, Beatriz Rumeu, and Beneharo Rodríguez, Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp. 213–222, 2008
14Dimitrios E. Bakaloudis, Christos G. Vlachos, Malamati A. Papakosta, Vasileios A. Bontzorlos, and Evangelos N. Chatzinikos, Diet Composition and Feeding Strategies of the Stone Marten (Martes foina) in a Typical Mediterranean Ecosystem The Scientific World Journal, vol. 2012, Article ID 163920, 11 pages, 2012
15Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
16Phyllostomus hastatus, Mery Santos, Luis F. Aguirre, Luis B. Vázquez, and Jorge Ortega, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 722, pp. 1–6 (2003)
17Sudhakaran, M.R. & P.S. Doss (2012). Food and foraging preferences of three pteropo- did bats in southern India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(1): 2295-2303
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License