Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Sapindales > Anacardiaceae > Mangifera > Mangifera indica
 

Mangifera indica (mango)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

Mangifera indica, commonly known as mango, is a species of flowering plant in the sumac and poison ivy family Anacardiaceae. It is found in the wild in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan where it is indigenous and cultivated varieties have been introduced to other warm regions of the world. It is a large fruit-tree, capable of a growing to a height and crown width of about 100 feet and trunk circumference of more than twelve feet.
View Wikipedia Record: Mangifera indica

Attributes

Air Quality Improvement [1]  None
Allergen Potential [1]  High
Carbon Capture [1]  Low
Screening - Summer [2]  Dense
Screening - Winter [2]  Dense
Shade Percentage [1]  85 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium
Bloom Period [2]  Late Winter
Drought Tolerance [2]  Medium
Fire Tolerance [2]  None
Frost Free Days [2]  1 year
Fruit/Seed Abundance [2]  High
Fruit/Seed Begin [2]  Summer
Fruit/Seed End [2]  Summer
Growth Form [2]  Single Stem
Growth Period [2]  Year Round
Growth Rate [2]  Moderate
Hazards [2]  Slight Toxicity
Janka Hardness [4]  1010 lbf (458 kgf) Soft
Leaf Type [3]  Evergreen
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Propagation [2]  Container, Seed
Root Depth [2]  4.986 feet (152 cm)
Seed Spread Rate [2]  Moderate
Shape/Orientation [2]  Rounded
Specific Gravity [5]  0.553
Structure [3]  Tree
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  Slow
Flower Color [2]  Yellow
Foliage Color [2]  Green
Fruit Color [2]  Orange
Flower Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Fruit Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Height [1]  37 feet (11.4 m)
Width [1]  30 feet (9.2 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 11 Low Temperature: 40 F° (4.4 C°) → 50 F° (10 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 11 Low Temperature: 40 F° (4.4 C°) → 50 F° (10 C°)
Light Preference [2]  Full Sun
Soil Acidity [2]  Mostly Acid
Soil Fertility [2]  Infertile
Water Use [1]  Moderate to Low

Protected Areas

Emblem of

Gujarat
Maharashtra

Prey / Diet

Lepidosaphes beckii (citrus mussel scale)[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Providers

Pollinated by 
Phyllostomus discolor (pale spear-nosed bat)[26]

Distribution

Caribbean; North America; Oceania;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
3Kattge, J. et al. (2011b) TRY - a global database of plant traits Global Change Biology 17:2905-2935
4Wood Janka Hardness Scale/Chart J W Morlan's Unique Wood Gifts
5Chave J, Coomes D, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Swenson NG, Zanne AE (2009) Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Ecology Letters 12: 351-366. Zanne AE, Lopez-Gonzalez G, Coomes DA, Ilic J, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Miller RB, Swenson NG, Wiemann MC, Chave J (2009) Data from: Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Dryad Digital Repository.
6Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
7HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
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11Norrbom, A.L. 2004. Fruit fly (Tephritidae) host plant database. Version Nov, 2004.
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13Artibeus jamaicensis, Jorge Ortega and Iván Castro-Arellano, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 662, pp. 1–9 (2001)
14Brachyphylla cavernarum, Pierre Swanepoel and Hugh H. Genoways, Mammalian Species No. 205, pp. 1-6 (1983)
15Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
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19Plants Consumed by Eulemur fulvus in Comoros Islands (Mayotte) and Potential Effects on Intestinal Parasites, A. Nègre, L. Tarnaud, J. F. Roblot, J. C. Gantier and J. Guillot, International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 27, No. 6, December 2006
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22Golden Parakeet, BirdLife International (1992) Threatened Birds of the Americas. Cambridge, UK: BirdLife International.
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29Pteropus hypomelanus, Deborah P. Jones and Thomas H. Kunz, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 639, pp. 1–6 (2000)
30An investigation into the role of the Mauritian flying fox, Pteropus niger, in forest regeneration, Dorte Friis Nyhagen, Stephen David Turnbull, Jens Mogens Olesen, Carl G. Jones, Biological Conservation 122 (2005) 491–497
31Pteropus tonganus, Carrie A. Miller and Don E. Wilson, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 552, pp. 1-6 (1997)
32DIETARY HABITS OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST BATS: THE PHILIPPINE FLYING FOXES, ACERODON JUBATUS AND PTEROPUS VAMPYRUS LANENSIS, SAM C. STIER AND TAMMY L. MILDENSTEIN, Journal of Mammalogy, 86(4):719–728, 2005
33NOTES ON THE DIET OF THE CRIMSON-COLLARED GROSBEAK (RHODOTHRAUPIS CELAENO) IN NORTHEASTERN MEXICO, Jack Clinton Eitniear & Alvaro Aragon Tapia, ORNITOLOGIA NEOTROPICAL 11: 363–364, 2000
34Proyecto Tití
35Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
36Sciurus variegatoides, Troy L. Best, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 500, pp. 1-6 (1995)
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38Status, distribution and conservation of the Ultramarine lorikeet Vini ultramarina in the Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia, Marc Ziembicki, Philippe Raust, Société d’Ornithologie de Polynésie, Papeete, Tahiti – December 2003
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