Plantae > Tracheophyta > Liliopsida > Poales > Poaceae > Vulpia > Vulpia bromoides
 

Vulpia bromoides (brome fescue; brome six-weeks grass; desert fescue)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

Vulpia bromoides, brome fescue, is a grass species native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia Minor. It has been introduced to North America, the Hawaiian Islands, Puerto Rico and other places. This bunchgrass has also been classified under the binomial Bromus dertonensis. As an introduced species in North America, brome fescue is found primarily in the western part of Canada, the southern and western part of the United States, and northern Mexico.
View Wikipedia Record: Vulpia bromoides

Invasive Species

Vulpia bromoides Is an annual weed of native grasslands and pastures in temperate climates of both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. Weedy annual grasses can reduce biodiversity on native grasslands, impede their restoration, and alter ecosystem processes. As a pasture weed, V. bromoides reduces productivity of grasslands; it has low palatability, and its seeds can damage hides and fleece of grazing animals. It readily invade wherever disturbance occurs. Integrated management which combines pasture rest, herbicide treatment and fertilizer application is shown to reduce seed production and improve control.
View ISSG Record: Vulpia bromoides

Attributes

Height [1]  15 inches (.37 m)
Lifespan [1]  Annual
Structure [3]  Grass
Light Preference [2]  Mostly Sunny
Soil Acidity [2]  Moderate Acid
Soil Fertility [2]  Mostly Infertile
Soil Moisture [2]  Mostly Dry

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Predators

Dama dama (fallow deer)[4]
Phytomyza nigra[5]
Tetramesa brevicollis[5]
Vicugna pacos (alpaca)[6]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Puccinia hordei (Barley brown rust)[7]

Distribution

Caribbean; North America; Oceania;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1PLANTATT - Attributes of British and Irish Plants: Status, Size, Life History, Geography and Habitats, M. O. Hill, C. D. Preston & D. B. Roy, Biological Records Centre, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (2004)
2ECOFACT 2a Technical Annex - Ellenberg’s indicator values for British Plants, M O Hill, J O Mountford, D B Roy & R G H Bunce (1999)
3Kattge, J. et al. (2011b) TRY - a global database of plant traits Global Change Biology 17:2905-2935
4Dama dama, George A. Feldhamer, Kelly C. Farris-Renner, and Celeste M. Barker, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 317, pp. 1-8 (1988)
5Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
6BOTANICAL COMPOSITION OF ALPACA (Lama pacos Linn.) DIET IN A CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN RANGE OF CHILE, G. Castellaro G., F. Squella N., F. León C., and A. Raggi S., CHILEAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 68:136-145 (APRIL-JUNE 2008)
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License