Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Fagales > Juglandaceae > Juglans > Juglans regia
 

Juglans regia (English walnut)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

Juglans regia, Persian walnut, English walnut, or especially in Great Britain, common walnut, is an Old World walnut tree species native to the region stretching from the Balkans eastward to the Himalayas and southwest China. The largest forests are in Kyrgyzstan, where trees occur in extensive, nearly pure walnut forests at 1,000–2,000 m altitude—notably at Arslanbob in Jalal-Abad Province. It is widely cultivated across Europe.
View Wikipedia Record: Juglans regia

Attributes

Air Quality Improvement [1]  Low
Allergen Potential [1]  High
Carbon Capture [1]  Medium
Screening - Summer [2]  Dense
Screening - Winter [2]  Porous
Shade Percentage [1]  91 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Bloom Period [2]  Mid Spring
Drought Tolerance [2]  Medium
Edible [3]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Fire Tolerance [2]  Low
Flower Type [3]  Monoecious
Frost Free Days [2]  6 months 10 days
Fruit/Seed Abundance [2]  High
Fruit/Seed Begin [2]  Summer
Fruit/Seed End [2]  Fall
Growth Form [2]  Single Stem
Growth Period [2]  Spring, Summer
Growth Rate [2]  Rapid
Janka Hardness [4]  1210 lbf (549 kgf) Medium
Leaf Type [3]  Deciduous
Lifespan [5]  Perennial
Pollinators [3]  Wind
Propagation [2]  Bare Root, Container, Seed
Root Depth [2]  3.346 feet (102 cm)
Scent [3]  The bruised leaves have a pleasant sweet though resinous smell.
Seed Spread Rate [2]  Slow
Seed Vigor [2]  High
Seeds Per [2]  40 / lb (88 / kg)
Shape/Orientation [2]  Rounded
Specific Gravity [7]  0.47
Structure [3]  Tree
Usage [3]  A yellow dye is obtained from the green husks; It is green; The green nuts (is this the same as the green husks?) and the leaves are also used; The rind of unripe fruits is a good source of tannin; A brown dye is obtained from the leaves and mature husks; It does not require a mordant and turns black if prepared in an iron pot; The dye is often used as a colouring and tonic for dark hair; The leaves and the husks can be dried for later use; A golden-brown dye is obtained from the catkins in early summer. It does not require a mordant; A drying oil is obtained from the seed. It is used in soap making, paints, etc. It is not very stable and quickly goes rancid; The nuts can be used as a wood polish. Simply crack open the shell and rub the kernel into the wood to release the oils. Wipe off with a clean cloth; The dried fruit rind is used to paint doors, window frames etc[145] (it probably protects the wood due to its tannin content). The shells may be used as anti-skid agents for tyres, blasting grit, and in the preparation of activated carbon; The leaves contain juglone, this has been shown to have pesticidal and herbicidal properties; The crushed leaves are an insect repellent; Juglone is also secreted from the roots of the tree, it has an inhibitory effect on the growth of many other plants; Bark of the tree and the fruit rind are dried and used as a tooth cleaner. They can also be used fresh; Wood - heavy, hard, durable, close grained, seasons and polishes well. A very valuable timber tree, it is used for furniture making, veneer etc;
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  None
Flower Color [2]  White
Foliage Color [2]  Green
Fruit Color [2]  Brown
Fruit Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Height [3]  66 feet (20 m)
Width [3]  66 feet (20 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 5 Low Temperature: -20 F° (-28.9 C°) → -10 F° (-23.3 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 9 Low Temperature: 20 F° (-6.7 C°) → 30 F° (-1.1 C°)
Light Preference [6]  Mixed Sun/Shade
Soil Acidity [6]  Neutral
Soil Fertility [6]  Rich
Soil Moisture [6]  Mostly Dry
Water Use [1]  Moderate
View Plants For A Future Record : Juglans regia

Protected Areas

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

North America;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
3Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Wood Janka Hardness Scale/Chart J W Morlan's Unique Wood Gifts
5PLANTATT - Attributes of British and Irish Plants: Status, Size, Life History, Geography and Habitats, M. O. Hill, C. D. Preston & D. B. Roy, Biological Records Centre, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (2004)
6ECOFACT 2a Technical Annex - Ellenberg’s indicator values for British Plants, M O Hill, J O Mountford, D B Roy & R G H Bunce (1999)
7Properties of Imported Tropical Woods, B. FRANCIS KUKACHKA, U.S. Department of Agriculture - Forest Service
8HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
9New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
10Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
11Norrbom, A.L. 2004. Fruit fly (Tephritidae) host plant database. Version Nov, 2004.
12Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
13Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
14Ecology of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Northwest Pakistan, S. J. Goldstein and A. F. Richard, International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 10, No. 6, 1989, pp. 531-567
15Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
16Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Chippewa Nature Center
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License