Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Apiales > Pittosporaceae > Pittosporum > Pittosporum tenuifolium
 

Pittosporum tenuifolium (tawhiwhi)

Synonyms: Pittosporum mayi; Pittosporum nigricans; Pittosporum translucens; Schoutensia monophylla; Trichilia monophylla

Wikipedia Abstract

Pittosporum tenuifolium is a small evergreen tree, up to 10 m (33 ft), native to New Zealand, commonly known as kōhūhū and black matipo, and by other Māori names kohukohu and tawhiwhi. It is sometimes grown under the cultivar name 'Nigricans', so called because of its black stems. In horticulture it is valued for its coloured foliage (cultivated variations include purple, "silver" and variegated leaves), and for its tolerance of some horticulturally difficult growing conditions, including dry soils and shade (although in northwest Europe, cold and exposed situations do not suit it). The flowers generally go unnoticed because of their colour, a very dark reddish-purple, and are scented only at night. It is found growing wild in coastal and lower mountain forest areas up to an altitude of 90
View Wikipedia Record: Pittosporum tenuifolium

Invasive Species

Pittosporum tenuifolium is a shrub or small tree that grows to about 10 m high and has bird-dispersed seeds. It is native to New Zealand and has naturalised in the Victoria, Tasmania and New South Wales states of Australia and in the state of California in the United States of America (Hoskings et al, 2007).
View ISSG Record: Pittosporum tenuifolium

Attributes

Allergen Potential [1]  Medium
Edible [2]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [2]  Hermaphrodite
Hazards [2]  This plant contains saponins; Saponins are found in many foods, such as some beans, and although they are fairly toxic to people they are poorly absorbed by the body and most pass straight through without any problem. They are also broken down if the food is thoroughly cooked for a long time. Saponins are much more toxic to some creatures, such as fish, and hunting tribes have traditionally put large quantities of them in streams, lakes etc in order to stupefy or kill the fish;
Leaf Type [2]  Evergreen
Lifespan [3]  Perennial
Pollinators [2]  Insects, Lepidoptera
Scent [2]  The flowers are honey-scented.
Structure [2]  Tree
Usage [2]  Very tolerant of trimming, plants can be grown as a formal or informal hedge in exposed maritime areas, though they do not stand extreme exposure; When grown as a formal hedge it is best trimmed in spring, though this will mean that the plant will not produce many flowers; A compromise is to only trim the hedge every other year;
Height [2]  23 feet (7 m)
Width [2]  13.12 feet (4 m)
View Plants For A Future Record : Pittosporum tenuifolium

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Exmoor Heaths 26455 England, United Kingdom
Isles of Scilly Complex 66350 England, United Kingdom    
Lizard Point 34565 England, United Kingdom    
Lyme Bay and Torbay 77215 England, United Kingdom

Predators

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Ileostylus micranthus (Mistletoe)[9]

Distribution

North America;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Derived from Allergy-Free Gardening OPALS™, Thomas Leo Ogren (2000)
2Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
3USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
4New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
5HONEYEATERS AND THE NEW ZEALAND FOREST FLORA: THE UTILISATION AND PROFITABILITY OF SMALL FLOWERS, Isabel Castro and Alastair W. Robertson, New Zealand Journal of Ecology (1997) 21(2): 169-179
6Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
7THE DIET OF THE NORTH ISLAND KAKA (NESTOR MERIDIONALIS SEPTENTRIONALIS) ON KAPITI ISLAND, Ron J. Moorhouse, New Zealand Journal of Ecology (1997) 21(2): 141-152
8FLESHY FRUITS OF INDIGENOUS AND ADVENTIVE PLANTS IN THE DIET OF BIRDS IN FOREST REMNANTS, NELSON, NEW ZEALAND, PETER A. WILLIAMS and BRIAN J. KARL, New Zealand Journal of Ecology (1996) 20(2): 127-145
9Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
Protected Areas provided by GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License