Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Felidae > Leopardus > Leopardus pardalis
 

Leopardus pardalis (Ocelot)

Synonyms: Felis pardalis
Language: Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The ocelot (/ˈɒsəlɒt/; Leopardus pardalis), also known as the dwarf leopard, is a wild cat distributed extensively within South America including the islands of Trinidad and Margarita, Central America, and Mexico. It has been reported as far north as Texas. North of Mexico, it is found regularly only in the extreme southern part of Texas, although there are rare sightings in southern Arizona.
View Wikipedia Record: Leopardus pardalis

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
24
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 9.03
EDGE Score: 2.31

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  19.401 lbs (8.80 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  256 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Ectothermic [2]  20 %
Diet - Endothermic [2]  70 %
Diet - Fish [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 7 months
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 7 months
Gestation [1]  77 days
Litter Size [1]  2
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  28 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  3 months 16 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; North America; Patfa Valley dry forests; South America; Trinity Hills Wildlife Sactuary;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Leopardus pardalis, Julie L. Murray and Gregory L. Gardner, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 548, pp. 1-10 (1997)
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Callithrix pygmaea, Wendy R. Townsend, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 665, pp. 1–6 (2001)
7Choloepus hoffmanni (Pilosa: Megalonychidae), VIRGINIA HAYSSEN, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(873):37–55 (2011)
8Agouti paca, Elizabeth M. Pérez, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 404, pp. 1-7 (1992)
9Movement patterns and food habits of four sympatric carnivore species in Belize, Central America, Michael John Konecny, Advances in Neotropical Mammalogy, 1984:243-264
10Dinomys branickii, Teresa G. White and Michael S. Alberico, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 410, pp. 1-5 (1992)
11Myocastor coypus, Charles A. Woods, Luis Contreras, Gale Willner-Chapman, and Howard P. Whidden, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 398, pp. 1-8 (1992)
12Peromyscus perfulvus (Rodentia: Cricetidae), CORNELIO SANCHEZ-HERNANDEZ, GARY D. SCHNELL, AND MARIA DE LOURDES ROMERO-ALMARAZ, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 833:1–8 (2009)
13Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
14Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
15International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License