Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Diprotodontia > Macropodidae > Macropus > Macropus giganteus
 

Macropus giganteus (Eastern Grey Kangaroo)

Wikipedia Abstract

The eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) is a marsupial found in southern and eastern Australia, with a population of several million. It is also known as the great grey kangaroo and the Forester kangaroo. Although a big eastern grey male typically masses around 66 kg (weight 145 lb.) and stands almost 2 m (6.6 ft.) tall, the scientific name, Macropus giganteus (gigantic large-foot), is misleading: the red kangaroo of the semi-arid inland is larger, weighing up to 90 kg.
View Wikipedia Record: Macropus giganteus

Infraspecies

Macropus giganteus giganteus (Northern grey kangaroo)
Macropus giganteus tasmaniensis (Tasmanian grey kangaroo)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
21
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.4
EDGE Score: 2.13

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  109.129 lbs (49.50 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  1 grams
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 9 months
Male Maturity [1]  3 years 6 months
Gestation [1]  36 days
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  25 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Speed [4]  34.896 MPH (15.6 m/s)
Weaning [1]  10 months 19 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Aquila audax (Wedge-tailed Eagle)[6]
Boopia mjobergi <Unverified Name>[7]
Echidnophaga myrmecobii (Red flea)[7]
Varanus varius (Lace Monitor)[8]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Australia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
5DIETS AND FORAGING BEHAVIOUR OF RED AND EASTERN GREY KANGAROOS IN ARID SHRUB LAND: IS FEEDING BEHAVIOUR INVOLVED IN THE RANGE EXPANSION OF THE EASTERN GREY KANGAROO INTO THE ARID ZONE?, TERENCE J. DAWSON, KIRSTEN J. MCTAVISH AND BEVERLEY A. ELLIS, Australian Mammalogy 26: 169-178 (2004)
6Breeding Biology and Diet of the Wedge-tailed Eagle Aquila audax in the New England Region of New South Wales, S.J.S. DEBUS, T.S. HATFIELD, A.J. LEY and A.B. ROSE, AUSTRALIAN FIELD ORNITHOLOGY 2007, 24, 93–120
7Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
8Diet of the Lace Monitor Lizard (Varanus varius) in south-eastern Australia, Brian W. Weavers, Australian Zoologist, Vol. 25(3) 83-85
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
10Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
11International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License