Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Diprotodontia > Macropodidae > Macropus > Macropus rufus
 

Macropus rufus (Red Kangaroo)

Wikipedia Abstract

The red kangaroo (Osphranter rufus) is the largest of all kangaroos, the largest terrestrial mammal native to Australia, and the largest extant marsupial. It is found across mainland Australia, avoiding only the more fertile areas in the south, the east coast, and the northern rainforests.
View Wikipedia Record: Macropus rufus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
20
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.02
EDGE Score: 2.08

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  121.255 lbs (55.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  1 grams
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 5 months
Male Maturity [1]  2 years 2 months
Gestation [1]  33 days
Litter Size [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  25 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  0 years 12 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Hattah-Kulkyne NP and Murray-Kulkyne Park National Park II 122831 Victoria, Australia
Riverland Biosphere Reserve Ia 1490891 South Australia, Australia
Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park II 332429 Northern Territory, Australia
Yathong Nature Reserve Ia 270264 New South Wales, Australia

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Southwest Australia Australia No

Emblem of

Australia
Northern Territory

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Canis lupus dingo (domestic dog)[6]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Australia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4DIETS AND FORAGING BEHAVIOUR OF RED AND EASTERN GREY KANGAROOS IN ARID SHRUB LAND: IS FEEDING BEHAVIOUR INVOLVED IN THE RANGE EXPANSION OF THE EASTERN GREY KANGAROO INTO THE ARID ZONE?, TERENCE J. DAWSON, KIRSTEN J. MCTAVISH AND BEVERLEY A. ELLIS, Australian Mammalogy 26: 169-178 (2004)
5Who's Eating Who
69.1 Dingo, Canis lupus dingo, L.K. Corbett, Sillero-Zubiri, C., Hoffmann, M. and Macdonald, D.W. (eds). 2004. Canids: Foxes, Wolves, Jackals and Dogs. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN/SSC Canid Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x + 430 pp.
7Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
9International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License