Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Anseriformes > Anatidae > Cygnus > Cygnus atratus
 

Cygnus atratus (Black Swan)

Wikipedia Abstract

The black swan (Cygnus atratus) is a large waterbird, a species of swan, which breeds mainly in the southeast and southwest regions of Australia. The species was hunted to extinction in New Zealand,but later reintroduced. Within Australia they are nomadic, with erratic migration patterns dependent upon climatic conditions. Black swans are large birds with mostly black plumage and red bills. They are monogamous breeders that share incubation duties and cygnet rearing between the sexes.
View Wikipedia Record: Cygnus atratus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
9
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
27
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.44589
EDGE Score: 2.13368

Attributes

Clutch Size [7]  6
Incubation [6]  38 days
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams, Coastal, Brackish Water
Wing Span [6]  5.904 feet (1.8 m)
Adult Weight [2]  12.456 lbs (5.65 kg)
Birth Weight [3]  258 grams
Female Weight [2]  11.244 lbs (5.10 kg)
Male Weight [2]  13.669 lbs (6.20 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [2]  21.6 %
Diet [4]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [4]  100 %
Forages - Water Surface [4]  100 %
Female Maturity [5]  2 years 3 months
Male Maturity [5]  2 years 3 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
New Zealand New Zealand No
Southwest Australia Australia No

Emblem of

Western Australia

Prey / Diet

Egeria densa (Brazilian waterweed)[6]
Ruppia megacarpa[6]
Vallisneria americana (Water Celery)[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Rhabdosargus sarba (Yellowfin bream)1

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Australia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Scott P, Wildfowl Trust. 1972. The swans. Boston (MA): Houghton Mifflin. 242 p.
3Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
6del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
7Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
8Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
9Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Ramsar Sites Information Service
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License