Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Sturnidae > Acridotheres > Acridotheres tristis
 

Acridotheres tristis (Common Myna)

Wikipedia Abstract

The common myna (Acridotheres tristis), sometimes spelled mynah, also sometimes known as "Indian myna", is a member of the family Sturnidae (starlings and mynas) native to Asia. An omnivorous open woodland bird with a strong territorial instinct, the myna has adapted extremely well to urban environments.
View Wikipedia Record: Acridotheres tristis

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

The common myna (Acridotheres tristis), also called the Indian myna, is a highly commensal Passerine that lives in close association with humans. It competes with small mammals and bird for nesting hollows and on some islands, such as Hawaii and Fiji, it preys on other birds' eggs and chicks. It presents a threat to indigenous biota, particularly parrots and other birdlife, in Australia and elsewhere.
View ISSG Record: Acridotheres tristis

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
9
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 2.99783
EDGE Score: 1.38575

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  112 grams
Birth Weight [3]  7.1 grams
Breeding Habitat [2]  Generalist
Wintering Geography [2]  Non-migrartory
Wintering Habitat [2]  Generalist
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore, Frugivore, Nectarivore, Granivore
Diet - Ectothermic [4]  10 %
Diet - Endothermic [4]  10 %
Diet - Fish [4]  10 %
Diet - Fruit [4]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  40 %
Diet - Nectar [4]  10 %
Diet - Seeds [4]  10 %
Forages - Mid-High [4]  10 %
Forages - Understory [4]  20 %
Forages - Ground [4]  70 %
Clutch Size [5]  2
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  200,000,000
Incubation [1]  15 days
Speed [6]  36.238 MPH (16.2 m/s)
Wing Span [6]  15 inches (.378 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (144)

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (76)Full list (221)

Predators

Accipiter rufitorques (Fiji Goshawk)[1]
Bubo bubo bengalensis (Rock Eagle-owl)[9]
Vulpes bengalensis (Bengal Fox)[10]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Oceania;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6Pande, S., A. Padhye, P. Deshpande, A. Ponkshe, P. Pandit, A. Pawashe, S. Pednekar, R. Pandit & P. Deshpande (2013). Avian collision threat assessment at ‘Bhambarwadi Wind Farm Plateau’ in northern Western Ghats, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 5(1): 3504–3515
7Food and Feeding Ecology of the Common Myna, Acridotheres tristis (Linn.), S. Sengupta, Proc. Indian natn. Sci. Acad. Vol 42, Part B, No. 6, pp. 338-345 (1976)
8"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
9Pande, S. & N. Dahanukar (2011). The diet of Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis and its agronomic significance. Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(8): 2011–2017.
108.2 Indian fox, Vulpes bengalensis, A.J.T. Johnsingh and Y.V. Jhala, Sillero-Zubiri, C., Hoffmann, M. and Macdonald, D.W. (eds). 2004. Canids: Foxes, Wolves, Jackals and Dogs. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN/SSC Canid Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x + 430 pp.
11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
12Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License