Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Musophagiformes > Musophagidae > Corythaeola > Corythaeola cristata
 

Corythaeola cristata (Great Blue Turaco)

Wikipedia Abstract

The great blue turaco (Corythaeola cristata) is a turaco, a group of African near-passerines. It is the largest species of turaco. Generally, the great blue turaco is 70–76 cm (28–30 in) in length with a mass of 800–1,231 g (1.764–2.714 lb). In the Bandundu province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the great blue turaco is actively hunted for meat and feathers. The blue and yellow tail feathers are prized for making good luck talismans. In the area of Bandundu around the city of Kikwit, it is called "Kolonvo".
View Wikipedia Record: Corythaeola cristata

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
61
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
56
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 45.4849
EDGE Score: 3.83913

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  2.127 lbs (965 g)
Birth Weight [1]  54 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  60 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  10 %
Diet - Plants [2]  30 %
Forages - Canopy [2]  20 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  50 %
Forages - Understory [2]  30 %
Clutch Size [4]  2
Incubation [3]  30 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Eastern Afromontane Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zimbabwe No
Guinean Forests of West Africa Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, São Tomé and Príncipe, Sierra Leone, Togo No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Accipiter tachiro (African Goshawk)[3]
Cercopithecus mitis (blue monkey)[3]
Naja melanoleuca (Black and White Cobra)[3]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Davainea calcaria <Unverified Name>[8]
Davainea undulata <Unverified Name>[8]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Africa;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5FORAGING ECOLOGY OF THREE SYMPATRIC TURACOS IN A MONTANE FOREST IN RWANDA, CHIN SUN AND TIMOTHY C. MOERMOND, The Auk 114(3):396-404, 1997
6"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License