Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Strigiformes > Strigidae > Bubo > Bubo lacteus
 

Bubo lacteus (Verreaux's Eagle-Owl)

Wikipedia Abstract

Verreaux's eagle-owl, also commonly known as the milky eagle owl or giant eagle owl, (Bubo lacteus) is a member of the family Strigidae. This species is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. A member of the Bubo genus, it is the largest African owl measuring up to 66 cm (26 in) in total length. This eagle-owl is a resident primarily of dry, wooded savanna. Verreaux's eagle-owl is mainly grey in color and is at once distinguished from other large owls by its bright pink eyelids, a feature shared with no other owl species in the world. Verreaux's eagle-owl is a highly opportunistic predator equipped with powerful talons. Just over half of its known diet is comprised by mammals but equal or even greater numbers of birds and even insects may be hunted locally, along with any other appropriately si
View Wikipedia Record: Bubo lacteus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
13
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
32
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 10.247
EDGE Score: 2.42011

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  4.976 lbs (2.257 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  80.3 grams
Female Weight [3]  5.787 lbs (2.625 kg)
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Ectothermic [2]  20 %
Diet - Endothermic [2]  60 %
Diet - Fish [2]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  10 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  10 %
Forages - Understory [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  60 %
Forages - Water Surface [2]  20 %
Clutch Size [4]  1
Incubation [3]  39 days
Maximum Longevity [5]  15 years
Nocturnal [2]  Yes
Wing Span [5]  4.986 feet (1.52 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Atelerix albiventris (Four-toed Hedgehog)[6]
Madoqua kirkii (Kirk's dik-dik)[7]
Otocyon megalotis (Bat-eared Fox)[8]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Kemp, AC. 1989. Estimation of Biological Indices for Little-known African Owls Meyburg, B.-U & R. D. Chancellor eds. 1989 Raptors in the Modern World WWGBP: Berlin, London & Paris
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
6Atelerix albiventris (Erinaceomorpha: Erinaceidae), ERICA M. SANTANA, HOLLY E. JANTZ, AND TROY L. BEST, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(857):99–110 (2010)
7Madoqua kirkii, Steven C. Kingswood and Arlene T. Kumamoto, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 569, pp. 1-10 (1997)
86.6 Bat-eared fox, Otocyon megalotis, J.A.J. Nel and B. Maas, Sillero-Zubiri, C., Hoffmann, M. and Macdonald, D.W. (eds). 2004. Canids: Foxes, Wolves, Jackals and Dogs. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN/SSC Canid Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. x + 430 pp.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License