Animalia > Mollusca > Cephalopoda > Octopoda > Octopodoidea > Enteroctopodidae > Enteroctopus > Enteroctopus dofleini
 

Enteroctopus dofleini (North Pacific giant octopus)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

Enteroctopus dofleini, also known as the giant Pacific octopus or North Pacific giant octopus, is a large marine cephalopod belonging to the genus Enteroctopus. Its spatial distribution includes the coastal North Pacific, along California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Russia, northern Japan, and Korea. It can be found from the intertidal zone down to 2,000 m (6,600 ft), and is best adapted to cold, oxygen-rich water. It is arguably the largest octopus species, based on a scientific record of a 71-kg (156-lb) individual weighed live. The alternative contender is the seven-arm octopus (Haliphron atlanticus) based on a 61-kg (134-lb) carcass estimated to have a live mass of 75 kg (165 lb). However, a number of questionable size records would suggest E. dofleini is the largest
View Wikipedia Record: Enteroctopus dofleini

Attributes

Water Biome [1]  Benthic, Coastal

Prey / Diet

Predators

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Dicyemennea brevicephala[6]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2CephBase - Cephalopod (Octopus, Squid, Cuttlefish and Nautilus) Database
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository.
5Diet of Pacific sleeper shark, Somniosus pacificus, in the Gulf of Alaska, Mei-Sun Yang and Benjamin N. Page, Fish. Bull. 97:406–409 (1999)
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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