Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Muscicapidae > Copsychus > Copsychus saularis
 

Copsychus saularis (Oriental Magpie-Robin)

Wikipedia Abstract

The oriental magpie-robin (Copsychus saularis) is a small passerine bird that was formerly classed as a member of the thrush family Turdidae, but now considered an Old World flycatcher. They are distinctive black and white birds with a long tail that is held upright as they forage on the ground or perch conspicuously. Occurring across most of the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia, they are common birds in urban gardens as well as forests. They are particularly well known for their songs and were once popular as cagebirds. The oriental magpie-robin is considered the national bird of Bangladesh.
View Wikipedia Record: Copsychus saularis

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
10
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.12316
EDGE Score: 1.41662

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  36 grams
Female Weight [3]  43 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Nectarivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  70 %
Diet - Nectar [2]  10 %
Diet - Vertibrates [2]  10 %
Forages - Understory [2]  20 %
Forages - Ground [2]  80 %
Clutch Size [5]  3
Clutches / Year [3]  2
Fledging [3]  16 days
Incubation [4]  12 days
Maximum Longevity [3]  6 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (132)

Biodiversity Hotspots

Emblem of

Bangladesh

Prey / Diet

Ficus obscura[6]
Ficus thonningii (Chinese banyan)[6]
Ficus virens[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (64)Full list (161)

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Basantisia sabahensis <Unverified Name>[7]
Capillaria ovopunctata <Unverified Name>[7]
Hectopsylla psittaci[8]
Hymenolepis brevis <Unverified Name>[7]
Oligorchis meerutensis <Unverified Name>[7]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1ALI, S. & S.D. RIPLEY (1983): Handbook of Birds of India and Pakistan. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
8International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License