Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Corvidae > Corvus > Corvus splendens
 

Corvus splendens (House Crow)

Wikipedia Abstract

The house crow (Corvus splendens), also known as the Indian, greynecked, Ceylon or Colombo crow, is a common bird of the crow family that is of Asian origin but now found in many parts of the world, where they arrived assisted by shipping. It is between the jackdaw and the carrion crow in size (40 cm (16 in) in length) but is slimmer than either. The forehead, crown, throat and upper breast are a richly glossed black, whilst the neck and breast are a lighter grey-brown in colour. The wings, tail and legs are black. There are regional variations in the thickness of the bill and the depth of colour in areas of the plumage.
View Wikipedia Record: Corvus splendens

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

The house crow (Corvus splendens) has established itself in at least 25 countries. It proliferates in human settlements and disturbed habitats and is especially suited to coastal settlements. It can even penetrate harsh desert environments once man has become established there. The house crow causes problems across a range of areas, including crop and livestock sustainability and poses a risk to native avifauna. It also carries a range of human pathogens but a link with human disease is yet to be established.
View ISSG Record: Corvus splendens

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
16
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.45016
EDGE Score: 1.49294

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  293 grams
Birth Weight [2]  13.7 grams
Female Weight [1]  270 grams
Male Weight [1]  317 grams
Weight Dimorphism [1]  17.4 %
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore, Nectarivore
Diet - Endothermic [3]  10 %
Diet - Fish [3]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  20 %
Diet - Nectar [3]  10 %
Diet - Scavenger [3]  50 %
Forages - Aerial [3]  10 %
Forages - Mid-High [3]  10 %
Forages - Understory [3]  20 %
Forages - Ground [3]  60 %
Clutch Size [5]  5
Incubation [4]  16 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Ficus benghalensis (Indian banyan)[6]
Ficus drupacea (brown-woolly fig)[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Fry, CH, S. Keith, and EK Urban. 2000. The birds of Africa. Volume VI. Academic Press, New York, New York, USA
2Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Images provided by Wikimedia Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License