Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Thraupidae > Dacnis > Dacnis cayana
 

Dacnis cayana (Blue Dacnis)

Wikipedia Abstract

The blue dacnis or turquoise honeycreeper (Dacnis cayana) is a small passerine bird. This member of the tanager family is found from Nicaragua to Panama, on Trinidad, and in South America south to Bolivia and northern Argentina. It is widespread and often common, especially in parts of its South American range. It occurs in forests and other woodlands, including gardens and parks. The bulky cup nest is built in a tree and the normal clutch is of two to three grey-blotched whitish eggs. The female incubates the eggs, but is fed by the male.
View Wikipedia Record: Dacnis cayana

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
17
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.79553
EDGE Score: 1.56768

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  14.1 grams
Breeding Habitat [2]  Tropical evergreen forests
Wintering Geography [2]  Non-migrartory
Wintering Habitat [2]  Tropical evergreen forests
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  40 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  50 %
Diet - Plants [3]  10 %
Forages - Aerial [3]  10 %
Forages - Canopy [3]  60 %
Forages - Mid-High [3]  30 %
Clutch Size [4]  2
Migration [5]  Migratory

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

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Consumers

Parasitized by 
Brachylecithum rarum <Unverified Name>[13]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1THE FEEDING ECOLOGY OF TANAGERS AND HONEYCREEPERS IN TRINIDAD, Barbara K. Snow and D. W. Snow, The Auk, 88: 291-322 (1971)
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
6Frugivory in Some Migrant Tropical Forest Wood Warblers, Russell Greenberg, BIOTROPICA 13(3): 215-223 1981
7The Feeding Ecology of Tanagers and Honeycreepers in Trinidad, Barbara K. Snow and D. W. Snow, The Auk Vol. 88, No. 2 (Apr., 1971), pp. 291-322
8Manhães, MA (2003) Dieta de traupíneos (Passeriformes, Emberizidae) no Parque Estadual do Ibitipoca, Minas Gerais, Brasil Iheringia 93: 59-73
9Parrini, R. and Raposo, MA, 2008, Associação entre aves e flores de duas espécies de árvores do gênero Erythrina (Fabaceae) na mata Atlântica do sudeste do Brasil, Iheringia, série Zoologia, Vol. 98, n. 1, pp 123-128
10"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
11The fruits of selectivity: how birds forage on Goupia glabra fruits of different ripeness, H. Martin Schaefer, Veronika Schaefer, J Ornithol (2006) 147:638–643
12A Meeting of Opportunists: Birds and Other Visitors to Mabea fistulifera (Euphorbiaceae) Inflorescences, Fábio Olmos and Ricardo L. P. Boulhosa, Ararajuba 8 (2): 93-98 (2000)
13Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License