Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Meliphagidae > Entomyzon > Entomyzon cyanotis
 

Entomyzon cyanotis (Blue-faced Honeyeater)

Wikipedia Abstract

The blue-faced honeyeater (Entomyzon cyanotis), also colloquially known as the bananabird, is a passerine bird of the honeyeater family, Meliphagidae. It is the only member of its genus, and it is most closely related to honeyeaters of the genus Melithreptus. Three subspecies are recognised. At around 29.5 cm (11.6 in) in length, the blue-faced species is large for a honeyeater. Its plumage is distinctive, with olive upperparts, white underparts, and a black head and throat with white nape and cheeks. Males and females are similar in external appearance. Adults have a blue area of bare skin on each side of the face readily distinguishing them from juveniles, which have yellow or green patches of bare skin.
View Wikipedia Record: Entomyzon cyanotis

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
19
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
37
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 14.7196
EDGE Score: 2.75491

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  105 grams
Female Weight [1]  97 grams
Male Weight [1]  114 grams
Weight Dimorphism [1]  17.5 %
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Nectarivore
Diet - Ectothermic [2]  10 %
Diet - Fruit [2]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  60 %
Diet - Nectar [2]  20 %
Forages - Aerial [2]  10 %
Forages - Canopy [2]  10 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  60 %
Forages - Understory [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  10 %
Clutch Size [4]  2
Incubation [3]  16 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Ficus leucotricha (desert fig)[5]
Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river redgum)[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Providers

Shelter 
Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river redgum)[6]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Higgins, PJ, Peter, JM and Steele, WK (Eds). (2001). Handbook of Australian, New Zealand & Antarctic Birds. Vol. 5, Tyrant-flycatchers to Chats. Oxford University Press, Melbourne
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
6Who's Eating Who
7Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License