Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Sphenisciformes > Spheniscidae > Eudyptes > Eudyptes chrysocome
 

Eudyptes chrysocome (Rockhopper Penguin)

Synonyms: Aptenodytes crestata; Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome; Eudyptes crestatus

Wikipedia Abstract

The southern rockhopper penguin group (Eudyptes chrysocome), are two subspecies of rockhopper penguin, that together are sometimes considered distinct from the northern rockhopper penguin. It occurs in subantarctic waters of the western Pacific and Indian Oceans, as well as around the southern coasts of South America.
View Wikipedia Record: Eudyptes chrysocome

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
43
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.37568
EDGE Score: 3.51163

Attributes

Clutch Size [3]  2
Clutches / Year [2]  1
Egg Length [2]  2.795 inches (71 mm)
Egg Width [2]  2.126 inches (54 mm)
Fledging [2]  70 days
Incubation [5]  33 days
Mating Display [3]  Ground display
Mating System [3]  Monogamy
Migration [1]  Intraoceanic
Snout to Vent Length [2]  20 inches (52 cm)
Speed [6]  5.033 MPH (2.25 m/s)
Water Biome [1]  Coastal
Adult Weight [2]  5.445 lbs (2.47 kg)
Birth Weight [3]  95.8 grams
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Fish [4]  30 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  70 %
Forages - Underwater [4]  100 %

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Macquarie Island Nature Reserve Ia 233540 Tasmania, Australia  
Palmer LTER Site Long Term Ecological Research   Antarctica    
Parque Atlantico Mar Chiquita Nature Reserve VI 706059 Cordoba, Argentina  
Cape Peninsula National Park II 70141 Western Cape, South Africa

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
New Zealand New Zealand No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Phalcoboenus australis (Striated Caracara)[11]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Audio

Play / PauseVolume
Provided by Center for Biological Diversity via Myxer Author: Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
3Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
6TRAVELING SPEED AND FORAGING RANGE OF MACARONI AND ROCKHOPPER PENGUINS AT MARION ISLAND, CHRISTOPHER R. BROWN, J. Field Ornithol., 58(2):118-125
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Geographic variation in the foraging behaviour, diet and chick growth of rockhopper penguins, Yann Tremblay, Yves Cherel, Mar Ecol Prog Ser 251: 279–297, 2003
9THE DIETS AND DIETARY SEGREGATION OF SEABIRDS AT THE SUBANTARCTIC CROZET ISLANDS, VINCENT RIDOUX, MARINE ORNITHOLOGY Vol. 22 No. 1 1994
10Amphipod-based food web: Themisto gaudichaudii caught in nets and by seabirds in Kerguelen waters, southern Indian Ocean, Pierrick Bocher, Yves Cherel, Jean-Philippe Labat, Patrick Mayzaud, Suzanne Razouls, Pierre Jouventin, Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 223: 261–276, 2001
11Population growth and density, diet and breeding success of striated caracaras Phalcoboenus australis on New Island, Falkland Islands, Paulo Catry, Miguel Lecoq, Ian J. Strange, Polar Biology Volume 31, Number 10, 1167-1174
12Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
13Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
14International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2